AICGS

Economics

Today, Germany stands at the center of Europe and is the most influential member of the European Union. Germany is a key partner of the U.S. in its most important international trade and economic relationships. As two of the world’s leading trading nations, the United States and Germany share a deep and abiding interest in the health of the world economy. There is no other country with which the U.S. shares a stronger mix of interests and values.
Reset

Energy Security Risk Assessment: A Transatlantic Comparison

The U.S. and West Germany once shared similar energy profiles and similar global energy challenges. Through the 1960s and in the beginning of the 1970s, with largely comparable energy mixes, …

Climate 2.0 – Can Geoengineering Make the World a Safer Place?

Wizardry to some, anathema to others, geoengineering—or climate engineering—is slowly encroaching on the territory of traditional climate policy. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) next Assessment Report, due in …

White, Grey, and Black (Euro) Swans: Dealing with Transatlantic Financial Risk in 2012

The idea that the euro crisis is over is hopeful at best, naïve at worst. It is far from over. We are actually at the beginning of a dangerous new …

Invisible Redistribution to Weaker Economies? The Case for EU Automatic Stabilizers

The Greek financial crisis seems finally to have been overcome, thanks to emergency European Union (EU) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) lending to the Greek government.  Bondholders will have been …

European Energy Security: A New Pattern of External Stability and Internal Risks

Introduction The fundamental dilemma of energy policy is its irreconcilable aims. Energy should be cheap, secure, and clean. While it is comparatively easy to achieve two of these objectives, it …

Same Economic Nightmares, Different Solutions: Transatlantic Approaches to International Macroeconomic Policymaking in the Face of the Crisis

Policy Report 48 Policy Report 48 argues that, in a climate of economic crisis and distress, transatlantic cooperation is still essential and must be expanded, despite current differences in policy. …

The End of the Years of Plenty? American and German Responses to the Economic Crisis

Policy Report 49 Policy Report 49 analyzes the policy responses of Germany and the United States to the continued economic and financial unrest. The authors examine the origins of Germany’s …

Lots of Talk, Little Action? Chances and Impediments for a New EU-U.S. Trade Agenda

Issue Brief 41 The annual meeting of the Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) in November 2011 presented an opportunity for German and American policymakers  to make progress on their efforts at …

The Eurozone Crisis and Implications for the United States

European leaders finally agreed to a more comprehensive plan to help bring the euro out of its current crisis. However, many experts agree that there is still much more that needs to be done to bring Europe, and the global economy as a whole, out of this mess. This week’s AICGS Advisor examines a few of the expert opinions on what still lies ahead:
Peter S. Rashish, Vice President for Europe & Eurasia, U.S Chamber of Commerce, gives his testimony before the House Financial Services subcommittee on International Monetary Policy and Trade on the U.S. implications of the euro zone crisis and what should be done to bolster trade between the two partners.

Transatlantic Relations in an Age of Fiscal Austerity

Issue Brief 40 Prior to the economic and financial crisis that began in 2008, the fiscal challenges of both Europe and the U.S. largely were viewed as longer-term issues, associated …