AICGS

Economics

Today, Germany stands at the center of Europe and is the most influential member of the European Union. Germany is a key partner of the U.S. in its most important international trade and economic relationships. As two of the world’s leading trading nations, the United States and Germany share a deep and abiding interest in the health of the world economy. There is no other country with which the U.S. shares a stronger mix of interests and values.
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The State of the West

These remarks given by Richard W. Fisher at the recent “State of the West” Symposium at Stanford University take a look at the economic situation of the Western United States, …

The Growing French-German Rift

Martin Schulz, the President of the European Parliament, does not mince words. Speaking before a German audience in Berlin, the German politician says that it is time to wake up …

It’s Not Only the Economy: Germany’s role in averting a Western meltdown

Download Policy Report The observed capital flows out of distressed countries into countries that are seen as “safe harbors” have in fact resulted in historically low yields of German and …

The United States Economy after the 2012 Election: Playing Chicken

American elections are many things.  One thing they rarely produce, however, is a deep and detailed discussion of policy proposals.  This is particularly true for economic policy.  In 2012, both …

Fracking and the Presidential Election: Drilling for Jobs

On November 6, the U.S. presidential election will be decided in nine swing states: Virginia, Florida, Ohio, Wisconsin, Nevada, Colorado, Iowa, New Hampshire, and North Carolina, representing a crucial number …

The U.S. Could Learn from Germany’s High-Tech Manufacturing

In this featured article from Scientific American, Stefan Theil, Newsweek’s Berlin Bureau Chief and regular AICGS contributor, examines how Germany is able to maintain a strong manufacturing sector, and thus a relatively strong …

Daily Travel and CO2 Emissions from Passenger Transport: A Comparison of Germany and the United States

Germany and the U.S. present many similarities that make a comparison of CO2 emissions from transport and related policies meaningful. This essay compares trends of CO2 emission from passenger transport, discusses policies to decrease emissions, and offers policy lessons for both the U.S. and Germany.

The Week in Europe

The last week of August has opened with the usual salvo of news about the debt crisis in Europe. Of course, American public opinion will turn its attention towards the …

The German Model

In this Handelsblatt report, Peter Ross Range takes an in-depth look at the so called “German Model” of economic and political success. Why, amidst all of the negative issues currently …