AICGS

Economics

Today, Germany stands at the center of Europe and is the most influential member of the European Union. Germany is a key partner of the U.S. in its most important international trade and economic relationships. As two of the world’s leading trading nations, the United States and Germany share a deep and abiding interest in the health of the world economy. There is no other country with which the U.S. shares a stronger mix of interests and values.
Reset

A New Geoeconomics Focus for 2017:Peter S. Rashish joins AICGS as Senior Fellow and Project Director

As Germany assumes the Presidency of the G20 largest world economies, a new U.S. president takes office, and uncertainties surround the future of the global economic order, the American Institute …

In Trade Policy, the Best Defense Remains a Good Offense

The hometown Washington Redskins may have just missed making it to the playoffs of the National Football League championships this season. But they showed once again how important a strong …

Transatlantic Relations in a Changing World Order: European and U.S. Responses to China’s Rise in Africa

A Changing World Order: China’s Rise in Africa The twenty-first century is characterized by the rise of new global players and changing power relations. In particular, China’s increasing international presence …

A Role for Business in Post-Conflict Societies

Which actors contribute to the stabilization of post-conflict societies—and how—is a question of utmost importance. Scholars and practitioners alike have argued that economic interdependencies and economic well-being is a beneficial …

The Sustainability of Transatlantic Growth

In the current climate of rising populism—or what Mark Blyth calls “global Trumpism”—the United States and Germany remain key engines of the global economy. While Germany has long been admired …

International Financial Regulatory Politics after the Crisis: Toward a New Progressive Era

The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-09 ended a two-decade period of steady economic growth and stable inflation in the world’s advanced markets, the so-called “Great Moderation.”[1] Since the mid-1980s, this …

Can the Transatlantic Relationship Survive the Populist Storm?

I feel lucky that my career has taken place during a dynamic period in the relationship between the U.S. and Europe.  I started college as the Reagan presidency was ending, …

U.S. Elections: Impact on the European Economy

Uncertainty Prevails Ten days after Donald Trump was elected president, the impact on the global and the European economy is still hard to predict. What prevails is uncertainty about Trump’s …

Is China’s ‘One Road’ an Autobahn? Implications of the Changing German-Chinese Relationship

China in Germany and Europe On October 24, German economics minister Sigmar Gabriel blocked the bid of the Chinese company Fujian Grand Chip to purchase the German silicon chipmaker Aixtron.  …

The Road to China: Challenges, Opportunities, and Partnership for the Next U.S. President

As the 2016 U.S. presidential election edges closer, China sits prominently on the short list of America’s biggest problems for millions of voters heading to the polls. Both the Democratic …

The Presidential Campaign and The Future of U.S. Trade Policy: Implications for Transatlantic Relations

The 2016 presidential contest in the United States has been characterized by a particularly heated debate about the role that trade policy should play in promoting US prosperity and national …

What a Trump Win Would Mean for the European Economy

On November 8, 2016, Americans will decide whether Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton will be the president of Europe’s most important trade and investment partner. In 2015, 20 percent of …