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Energy Security Risk Assessment: A Transatlantic Comparison

Despite facing similar challenges, the United States and Germany continually diverge in their creation of energy policy. Mr. Aki Kachi argues that Germany pursues risk-averse energy policy, citing the nation’s …

Volkswagen Outpaces Economic Forecasts While Southern European Car Sales Dwindle

This week, Volkswagen (VW) announced wage increases for over 100,000 workers in six of its plants in western Germany. Representatives of IG Metall and upper management of VW reached this …

The Transatlantic Climate and Energy Dialogue: Urban and Regional Transportation and Energy Problems and Solutions

AICGS’ is undertaking a project on “The Transatlantic Climate and Energy Dialogue: Urban and Regional Transportation and Energy Problems and Solutions” in 2012. This project will continue the transatlantic climate …

New Systemic Risks: Challenges and Opportunities for Transatlantic Cooperation

The project “New Systemic Risks: Challenges and Opportunities for Transatlantic Cooperation” analyzes governance of systemic risks in the United States and the EU in three relevant policy fields. Differences and similarities of the transatlantic partners in the four pillars of risk governance—assessment and evaluation of risks, risk management, and risk communication—within the policy fields of economic and financial policy, raw materials policy, and security politics will be identified with the help of case studies (single case studies and comparative analyses). The project is undertaken in cooperation of SWP and AICGS.

The End of the Atomic Dream: One Year After Fukushima, the Shortfalls of Nuclear Energy Are Clearer Than Ever

The anniversary of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima prompts Non-Resident Fellow to look for an energy policy that is “economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable.”

Iran: Through the Looking Glass

As tensions rise over Iran’s nuclear ambitions, the European Union has ratcheted up its pressure on Iran with an oil embargo. Tehran is now threatening with an embargo of its own, while the United States leaves its threat of military action on the table and Israel worries about the clock running out of time to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Is 2012 the year where war becomes inevtiable? And what can Germany or the EU do to prevent it?

NATO and Emerging Security Challenges: Beyond the Deterrence Paradigm

Michael Rühle discusses the role of NATO in the context of emerging security challenges facing the global community. According to Mr. Rühle, the use of force by NATO will no longer be enough to counter new and unexpected challenges. To continue to be effective moving forward, NATO must find a new approach to the security obstacles that lie ahead.

The Nuclear Power Endgame in Germany

As the era of nuclear energy approaches its end in Germany, the country can show how fast the shift to renewable energy can be achieved, writes R. Andreas Kraemer, Director & CEO of the Ecologic Institute in Berlin and co-author of AICGS Policy Report 31. In an essay that examines the history of the German anti-nuclear power movement and discusses the future of German alternative energy, Kraemer argues that Germany can realistically achieve 100 percent reliance on renewable energy and be the model going forward for other nations in a relatively short time frame. A version of this article originally appeared in The San Francisco Chronicle.

The German Nuclear Energy Phase Out: Neither Revolution Nor Going it Alone

The nuclear energy phase out in Germany is no revolution, writes Marcel Viëtor, Program Officer for Energy and Climate at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) and a Visiting Fellow at AICGS in June 2011. From the outside, it may appear as though the German government had come to some sort of radical decision following the nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima, Viëtor argues, but instead the withdrawal from nuclear energy in Germany is a process that has been in development for quite some time. A version of this essay originally appeared in Moskovskie Novosti.

Hungry for Climate Action? NATO and Energy Security

NATO has a legitimate role to play in energy security, writes Michael Rühle, Head of the Energy Security Section in NATO’s Emerging Security Challenges Division and a regular contributor to the Advisor, but it is not yet clear what this role should be. In his essay, Rühle outlines the reasons for NATO’s interest in energy security and suggests what difference the Alliance could make in the energy security debate moving forward.

Climate and Energy Policy After the U.S. Midterm Elections

Conditions for U.S. climate and energy policy have changed considerably after comprehensive climate and energy legislation failed in the 111th Congress. In the newly elected 112th Congress, emphasis will likely shift away from climate change to more orthodox supply side energy strategies. Writing from a European perspective, Sascha Müller-Kraenner, Managing Director of The Nature Conservancy in Europe and a regular contributor to the Advisor, explores the consequences of these U.S. changes for the European Union’s climate and energy strategy as well as for a future international climate regime.

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