AICGS

Society, Culture & Politics Program

Reset

Is there a “Brown-Army-Faction” in Germany?

In his essay entitled Does a “Braune-Armee-Fraktion” in Germany Exist?, AICGS Non-Resident Fellow Alexander Ritzmann examines whether the “Nationalsozialistischer Untergrund,” or National Socialist Underground (NSD), can be categorized as a terrorist group. Having recently come into the public spotlight following more than a decade of under the radar murders and robberies, the German Federal government, argues Mr. Ritzmann, must be cautious in labeling this newly surfaced group.

Stand Up and Fight is the Message Philipp Rösler Sent from Frankfurt

At their party convention this past weekend, Germany’s Free Democratic Party (FDP) made one thing clear: they intend to push forward in the face of mounting criticism. In his essay Stand Up and Fight is the Message Philipp Rösler Sent from Frankfurt, Dr. Tim Stuchtey, Managing Director of the Brandenburgisches Institut für Gesellschaft und Sicherheit (BIGS) and Director of the Business & Economics Program at AICGS, examines what was covered at the convention, as well as the remarks made by FDP Chairman Philipp Rösler.

Seriousness and Wish for Unity

In his essay Seriousness and Wish for Unity, AICGS Trustee Andreas Nick examines the serious tone set by Angela Merkel and other CDU leaders at this week’s party convention. While Merkel’s goals of a stronger Europe and a practical approach to global issues were once again at the forefront, it appears that the CDU’s plan for the 2013 general election has begun to take shape.

Constructive Power and Reconciliation: The Importance of German Societal Organizations

The Importance of German Societal Actors The Euro-zone crisis has focused international attention on Germany’s power, depicting the Federal Republic either as selfless savior (constructive power) or as dictatorial demon …

Immigrants in Foreign Policy Making in Germany and the U.S.: Two Very Different Struggles to Embrace Diversity

In a globalized world, domestic politics no longer stop at the water’s edge, as transnational actors have emerged who push beyond existing borders. Some are driven by hybrid identities that …

Merkel’s Momentum

In this week’s At Issue, Executive Director Jack Janes reviews the CDU party convention in Leipzig and Angela Merkel’s political leverage as she looks forward to the second half of her second term as Chancellor.

Germany’s Telling Reaction to bin Laden’s Death

A version of Dr. Jackson Janes’ At Issue essay appeared in Real Clear World on May 14, 2011: Germany’s Telling Reaction to bin Laden’s Death.

How Geography Explains Economics For Germany and the U.S

Dr. Tim Stuchtey quoted in “How Geography Explains Economics For Germany and the U.S.,” by Derek Thompson, The Atlantic, June 9, 2011.

A Proposal for Historical Reconciliation: The “Dokdo Movement” of Korean Americans in the Washington Area

Watching the daily lives of Korean Americans, one thing stands out: the way they live. Korean Americans are distinct, from the wrapping paper they use at dry cleaners, their supermarkets, their senior citizens associations, Korean restaurants, or even the inside of their
cars. The reason for Korean Americans’ distinction is Dokdo, a small group of islets between
Korea and Japan. Wherever there are Korean Americans you will find objects or people related to Dokdo. That does not mean, however, that Korean Americans are obsessed with
it …

The Muslim-American Muddle

In his in-depth article “The Muslim-American Muddle” from National Affairs, Professor Peter Skerry examines the identity and crises of Muslim-Americans. While already dealing with being stereotyped by non-Muslim Americans as terrorists, Muslim-Americans must also navigate the many ethnic divisions within their own population. A new approach, argues Professor Skerry, is necessary to move forward.

Half-term Report for the German Government

With the current parliament in Germany half way through its normal lifespan of four years, now is as opportune a moment as any to review the performance of the federal …

Compensation as a Mechanism of Reconciliation? Lessons from the German Payments for Nazi Forced and Slave Labor

In the growing scholarly discussion on reconciliation after violent conflicts, compensation
payments to former victims are described as a fundamental tool besides apologies, truth
commissions, or trials. Germany’s confrontation with its Nazi past is generally considered
a role model. Even if there is no consensus about a definition, “reconciliation” can be described as a process that offers former enemies a way to a shared future. The aim is to
overcome the past, but not to forget it …