AICGS

Foreign & Security Policy Program

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Dying for Kunduz? – Justifications of the German Mission in Afghanistan in Political Eulogies

Globally-oriented, extended security policies follow patterns of justification that differ from those drawn on by traditional policies of national self-defense. One of the fundamental differences is the fact that ongoing …

The Routinization of Security Communication and the Risk of Military Casualties

Dr. Ulf von Krause discusses how internal risk communication in the Bundeswehr has evolved from the Balkan wars to today.

Saarland’s Signals

In this At Issue, Executive Director Jack Janes examines the results of the state election in Saarland and their potential signals for both the subsequent state elections to follow during 2012, as well as the national election in 2013.

Executive Director Jack Janes and Peter Ross Range published in New York Times

AICGS Executive Director Jack Janes and Peter Ross Range had their essay “Can Joachim Gauck make Germany Likable?” published in the New York Times Sunday Review Opinion page on Sunday, …

Enhancing European Security

Europe will soon need to focus greater attention on its shared defense policy, an aspect that has been overlooked for quite some time. According to the authors, Germany must take the lead for such an initiative.

Can Joachim Gauck Make Germany Likable?

Germany is at a crossroads: become the Continent’s leader or be seen as the neighborhood bully. In a stroke of national fortune, it is about to install, as its next president, a man known more for his integrity and moral leadership than for his political acumen, a man who can help make sure his country follows the first course.

Consequential Cuts: American Troops in Germany

Robert Gerald Livingston explores the motives for U.S. troop reduction in Germany, as well as the potential consequences for such a move. What effect, if any, could this have on Germany’s role in Europe’s defense plans?

The End of the Atomic Dream: One Year After Fukushima, the Shortfalls of Nuclear Energy Are Clearer Than Ever

The anniversary of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima prompts Non-Resident Fellow to look for an energy policy that is “economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable.”

Afghanistan Afterward

In this At Issue, Executive Director Jack Janes looks at the proposed troop withdraw date for Afghanistan in the wake of the civilian killings by a U.S. soldier over the past weekend. Following over a decade of conflict in Afghanistan, coalition forces now seem increasingly eager to transfer responsibility to the Afghan people. However, it has become very clear that a number of challenges remain for the future stability of Afghanistan, especially once coalition forces do leave.

The Two Faces of German Politics

The controversy surrounding the next German federal president shows that more is at play in German politics than traditional power brokering.

Measuring Movement in Munich

In this week’s At Issue, Executive Director Jack Janes writes from this year’s annual Munich Security Conference (MSC). A benchmark for the defense discussions of the transatlantic community for almost fifty years, the conference has had to continually incorporate new global threats and concerns in its agenda. With the centers of global power continuing to shift away from Cold War era alignments, the challenges for the US and Europe require increased dialogue with more partners and players around the globe.

Iran: Through the Looking Glass

As tensions rise over Iran’s nuclear ambitions, the European Union has ratcheted up its pressure on Iran with an oil embargo. Tehran is now threatening with an embargo of its own, while the United States leaves its threat of military action on the table and Israel worries about the clock running out of time to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Is 2012 the year where war becomes inevtiable? And what can Germany or the EU do to prevent it?