James D. Bindenagel

Center for International Security and Governance

Contributor

James D. Bindenagel was appointed Henry-Kissinger Professor at the University of Bonn and is founding director of the Center for International Security and Governance (created at the same time as the professorship) in October 2014. Bindenagel is considered a leading expert on transatlantic relations with a special focus on the German-U.S. relationship, with which he is familiar from many years of personal practical experience. During his thirty years in the U.S. diplomatic service, Professor Bindenagel worked both for the U.S. State Department in U.S. consulates and embassies in West Germany, East Germany, and the unified Germany. He was interim U.S. Ambassador to Germany from 1996 to 1997.

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The Munich Security Conference and the Transatlantic Partnership

At the 2018 Munich Security Conference, Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger awarded Senator John McCain the Ewald von Kleist Award for his services to transatlantic relations and to the Munich Security Conference. In his tribute to Senator McCain, former US Vice President Biden praised the senator’s contributions to America’s leadership in making the world stronger and Europe better.

Expectations for the Munich Security Conference

The Munich Security Conference convenes at a time of the great unraveling of the world order.   The world is less stable and more uncertain than it has been for years. …

Trump’s World

Donald Trump has tapped anger over eroding middle class income, loss of identity, and anti-establishment fervor in a campaign of anger that won the Electoral College vote and the presidency …

U.S. Presidential Election 2016: Implications for Transatlantic Relations

November 8 is Election Day in America.  The U.S. has not one national election, but fifty state elections with 135 million voters, 538 Electors in the Electoral College.  270 Electors’ …

Merkel On the Brink? Germany at a crossroad of domestic and foreign policy change

The domestic political disquiet over the refugees since the March 13 state elections in Germany has not subsided. On the contrary, the debate about German identity and the chancellor’s governance …

The Obama Security Strategy and Beyond: Implications for Germany and Europe

Barack Obama’s final year in office is one with the world in upheaval. It is also the year that will shape the security strategy for the next U.S. president. This …

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Remembrance of a German Statesman

Hans-Dietrich Genscher was German foreign minister when I first met him.  On 1 October 1982, I was in Bonn to consult with Wolfgang Ischinger, his office director.  Our meeting was …

Taking Stock in United Germany at 25 Years

AICGS is pleased to present this collection of essays reflecting on the 25th anniversary of German unification in October 2015. We are grateful to those who have contributed to this …

Building the Transatlantic Relationship

This speech was delivered as the Columbus Day Lecture 2014 at the Center for International Security and Governance, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, where Ambassador James D. Bindenagel is the Henry Kissinger …

The Miracle of Leipzig

This is a story about the secret of freedom—courage.  Germans in Leipzig courageously faced down a regime that had killed fellow citizens, whose only crime was to seek freedom and …

Germany: Reluctant Leader and Indispensable Power

In this article in the Globalist, co-author of AICGS German-American Issues 12 Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel outlines Germany’s post-election future in the euro zone, broader foreign policy, and leadership in the …

Germany’s Historical Euro Responsibility

In this Op-Ed, which originally appeared in Süddeutsche Zeitung on January 12, 2012, J.D. Bindenagel takes a brief look back at the history of Europe leading up to the push for a European Monetary Union. According to Mr. Bindenagel, the future success of the Euro rests on the will of Europe’s leaders, and Germany in particular, to make their monetary union work.

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