AICGS

Angela Stanzel

European Council on Foreign Relations

Contributor

Angela Stanzel joined the European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) as a Policy Fellow for the Asia Programme in 2014. Before joining ECFR, Angela worked for the International Affairs Office of the Koerber Foundation in Berlin, for the German Marshall Fund of the United States (Asia Programme) in Brussels, and the German Embassy (cultural section) in Beijing. Angela earned her PhD in Sinology at Freie Universität Berlin, conducting research about China-Pakistan relations. Alongside EU-China relations her work focuses on China’s foreign and security policy in East Asia and South Asia. Recent articles and publications include A German view of the Asian Infrastrcture Investment Bank (April 2017), Germany’s turnabout on Chinese investment (ECFR, March 2017), Opportunities and limits of China’s role in Afghanistan (All China Review, March 2017), China and Brexit: what’s in it for us? (ECFR, September 2016), Has Xi Jinping changed China? (China Policy Institute, October 2016).

She is a 2017-2018 participant in AICGS’ project “A German-American Dialogue of the Next Generation: Global Responsibility, Joint Engagement,” sponsored by the Transatlantik-Programm der Bundesrepublik Deutschland aus Mitteln des European Recovery Program (ERP) des Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Energie (BMWi).

Recent Content

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Anticipating Economic Challenges

Geoeconomics Recommendations With radical unpredictability being a factor on both sides of the Atlantic, anticipating some of the main obstacles facing the transatlantic partnership is a core task for participants …

The Dangers of Division: The Importance of Transatlantic Cooperation in a Changing Political Climate

AICGS is pleased to present the written results of the second year of its project “A German-American Dialogue of the Next Generation: Global Responsibility, Joint Engagement.” The six authors together …

Investment Screening: Europe between China and the U.S.

In recent years, there have been rising political and public concerns about foreign investment in industrialized countries around the world, questioning whether their respective existing screening mechanisms are sufficient. In …