AICGS

Alexander Ritzmann

European Foundation for Democracy

Non-Resident Fellow

Alexander Ritzmann is a Senior Policy Advisor at the European Foundation for Democracy (EFD) in Brussels, Belgium, and a Senior Research Fellow at the Brandenburg Institute for Society and Security (BIGS) in Potsdam, Germany. He is also co-chair of the European Commission’s Radicalisation Awareness Network (RAN) Communication and Narratives (C&N) Working Group. From September 2012 – December 2015, Alexander worked as Senior Advisor MENA Region and Project Manager for GIZ, the German Development Cooperation, based in Cairo, Egypt. He has also lived and worked in Berlin, Brussels, Beirut, Jerusalem, Ramallah and Washington D.C. In 2007 he was a DAAD-Fellow at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies (AICGS), Johns Hopkins University, in Washington, DC. From 2001 – 2006 Alexander was a member of the Berlin State Parliament, overseeing the state police and intelligence agency, focusing on homeland security and data protection issues. He received his Master’s degree in Political Science from the Free University Berlin in 2000.

Recent Content

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Gibt es eine Braune-Armee-Fraktion in Deutschland?

Gibt es in Deutschland im Untergrund operierende rechtsextremistische Terrorstrukturen, gar eine „Braune-Armee-Fraktion? Seit knapp zwei Wochen ist bekannt, dass eine Gruppe Rechtsextremer über dreizehn Jahre hinweg in Deutschland gemordet und …

Is there a “Brown-Army-Faction” in Germany?

In his essay entitled Does a “Braune-Armee-Fraktion” in Germany Exist?, AICGS Non-Resident Fellow Alexander Ritzmann examines whether the “Nationalsozialistischer Untergrund,” or National Socialist Underground (NSD), can be categorized as a terrorist group. Having recently come into the public spotlight following more than a decade of under the radar murders and robberies, the German Federal government, argues Mr. Ritzmann, must be cautious in labeling this newly surfaced group.

The Benefits of Reviving Transatlantic Armaments Cooperation

During the Cold War, Germany and the U.S. fostered close arms cooperation and development. Yet, after German unification, Germany focused on developing and procuring armament systems either domestically or within …

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