How has German unity impacted the U.S. in terms of its policies and its expectations of Germany as part of that evolving Europe in which it has become so critically important? How have the following years impacted the shaping of U.S. foreign policy, its goals, and its application? What expectations emerged about the global role of the U.S. and our expectations of a unified Germany? The questions above are the ones on which AICGS has asked commentators in this series to reflect upon as the 25th anniversary of the unification of Germany approaches on October 3. They are all significant questions but, given the space constraints, I would like to limit this brief comment to one particular aspect on which I have some modest expertise: the extensive overlap between the process that yielded German unification and the process that yielded expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

Cover Forging the future of Germany and Europe

The questions, choices, and decisions that Germany of 2010 faces today are vastly different than those the two Germanys confronted over two decades ago. This special publication, made possible by the Dräger Foundation, looks back not only at the changes in Germany as they unfolded in 1989 and 1990, but offers views on Germany’s role in Europe and the world in the decades to come.