Global Transitional Justice

Current Strategies, Trends and Counter-Trends across the Atlantic

June 4, 2019, 12:00 – 1:30 pm

Seeking justice for past atrocities has become a standard practice for countries after conflict or violent rule. These transitional justice processes are often supported by international organizations and NGOs or through foreign policy efforts of other countries. Both Germany and the United States support transitional justice processes in different parts of the world through the provision of financial means, through exchange and knowledge transfer, and also through technical expertise. While Germany is currently developing a new foreign policy strategy on transitional justice, revoking ICC chief prosecutor Bensouda’s visa could give the impression that the United States is rather renouncing international justice efforts. But is that actually the case? How do both countries approach transitional justice in their foreign policy? Do these approaches fit together? And how do they relate to the global transitional justice paradigm?

Join AICGS/DAAD Research Fellow Mariam Salehi as she presents her research on how the United States and Germany deal with the past.


Dr. Mariam Salehi is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Conflict Studies, University of Marburg. While working toward her Ph.D., she was as a research fellow in the research network “Re-configurations. History, Remembrance and Transformation Processes in the Middle East and North Africa,” funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research. Prior to coming to Marburg, Mariam was a research associate at the chair for political science with a focus on international politics at Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg. Her research interests are situated at the intersection of International Relations and Peace and Conflict Studies. They include transitional justice and processes of political and social change. She has written about her research for academic and non-academic publications, among the latter for openDemocracy, Internationale Politik, Frankfurter Rundschau, and The Washington Post’s The Monkey Cage blog.

Location

AICGS

1755 Massachusetts Avenue NW | Suite 700 | Washington, DC


AICGS
1755 Massachusetts Avenue NW | Suite 700 | Washington, DC