AICGS

Peter S. Rashish

Senior Fellow; Director, Geoeconomics Program

Peter S. Rashish, who counts over 25 years of experience counseling corporations, think tanks, foundations, and international organizations on transatlantic trade and economic strategy, is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Geoeconomics Program at AICGS. He also writes The Wider Atlantic blog.

Mr. Rashish serves as a Senior Advisor to Transnational Strategy Group LLC, a Washington-based international business and government affairs consultancy, and to the Brussels-based European Policy Centre. He has served as Vice President for Europe and Eurasia at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, where he spearheaded the Chamber’s advocacy for an ambitious and comprehensive trade agreement between the United States and the European Union, which was officially launched as the “Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership,” and developed new engagements in the continent’s emerging markets.

Previously, Mr. Rashish was a Senior Advisor for Europe at McLarty Associates, and has held positions as Executive Vice President of the European Institute, on the Paris-based staff of the International Energy Agency, and as a consultant to the World Bank, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, the Atlantic Council, the Bertelsmann Foundation, and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. Mr. Rashish has testified on the euro zone and U.S.-European economic relations before the House Financial Services Subcommittee on International Monetary Policy and Trade and the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Europe and Eurasia and has advised two U.S. presidential campaigns.

He earned his B.A. from Harvard College and an M.Phil. in international relations from Oxford University. He speaks French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

Recent Content

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Mehr als jeder zweite Deutsche hält Beziehung zu USA für zerrüttet

Featuring Peter Rashish via Handelsblatt on February 28, 2018.

Welcome to The Wider Atlantic

The Wider Atlantic blog examines the United States, Germany, and the European Union from a national interest perspective. It takes a wide-angle look at the policies, agreements, and institutions that …

U.S. Trade Policy: Clearing the Brush – or Pulling up Stakes?

The Trump administration has been in office for a little over a year now, and it is becoming clear there are two ways to view its approach to trade policy. …

For Germany’s Social Democrats, a Chance to be Europe’s Superman

It was 80 years ago this year that DC Comics first published Superman, and with this comic book series launched a franchise of superheroes that shows no sign of losing …

The National Security Strategy: Symbolism vs. Substance

The National Security Strategy (NSS) released by the White House this week—the only time in the first year of a new presidency—is a sober and realistic assessment of the state …

The G20 Trifecta

Germany – Argentina – Japan: Not a list of three regional soccer powerhouses, but rather the troika of past, current, and future presidency countries of the G20. On December 1, …

German Economic Leadership in Europe: More Uncertain and More Needed

The instability produced by the failure to form a so-called “Jamaica” coalition in Germany increases the importance of moving from reliance on de facto German leadership of the Eurozone to …

U.S. trade policy in the age of Trump: What role for Europe in the “New Nationalism”?

One year ago, the American public elected in Donald Trump a president who painted international trade not as a generator of U.S. prosperity and a multiplier of its national interest, …

Europe’s Illusions

Although for more than 70 years common values were invoked to keep the transatlantic partnership together, now is the time to assert shared U.S.-German interests.

America’s Four Economic Families

The United States may have two major political parties, but it is becoming clear that it has four economic families: Small government + free trade = Mainstream Republicans Small government …

Austria, Europe’s un-Bellwether Nation

For many years, the state of Maine was a reliable indicator of the U.S. political mood. So much so that the phrase “As Maine goes, so goes the nation” gained …

Out of Four, One? Why Germany’s “Impossible” Coalition Just Might Work

“Everything must change so that everything can stay the same.” So wrote Lampedusa in The Leopard about a Sicilian aristocracy coping with revolutions in nineteenth century Italy. But this phrase …