Philipp Liesenhoff is an AICGS/GMF Fellow with the American-German Situation Room in Washington, DC, until June 2018. In Germany, Philipp Liesenhoff works at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin. An economist by training, he worked as a research assistant at the German Marshall Fund between 2014 and 2017 and has previous work …Read More

On December 5, 2017, the European institutions—Commission, Council, and Parliament—reached political agreement on reforming the EU’s trade defense instruments. This “modernization” of anti-dumping legislation is, in fact, an attempt to provide the EU with stronger tools to tackle the allegedly “unfair” practices of its trade partners. On its website, the Commission advertises that the deal …Read More

Germany – Argentina – Japan: Not a list of three regional soccer powerhouses, but rather the troika of past, current, and future presidency countries of the G20. On December 1, Berlin handed the baton to Buenos Aires, and for the next year the government of Argentine president Mauricio Macri will be in charge of organizing …Read More

Earlier this November, the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission released its 2017 report, recommending that the U.S. investment screening mechanism, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), be updated. This follows closely on the heels of a bill, introduced by Republican Senators Richard Burr and John Cornyn along with Democrat Dianne …Read More

One year ago, the American public elected in Donald Trump a president who painted international trade not as a generator of U.S. prosperity and a multiplier of its national interest, but as a set of bargains sapping the U.S. of jobs, prosperity, and power. As one of the U.S.’ major trading partners, this could have …Read More

The United States may have two major political parties, but it is becoming clear that it has four economic families: Small government + free trade = Mainstream Republicans Small government + protectionism = Populist Republicans Big government + protectionism = Populist Democrats Big government + free trade = Mainstream Democrats If it is true that …Read More

The German elections are just over two weeks away on September 24.  Chancellor Angela Merkel is nearly certain to be reelected to a fourth term, so the main unknown surrounds her choice of coalition partner(s). Will it be another grand coalition with the left-of-center Social Democrats (the SPD may wish some time in opposition), two-party …Read More

The most important contribution the new German Federal Government can make is to support and reform the global economic order that has been responsible for 70 years of peace and prosperity. Whether it is through institutions like the World Trade Organization and the European Union, countless bilateral trade agreements, or the informal norms and principles …Read More

During Richard Nixon’s historic 1972 visit to China, the U.S. president reportedly asked Premier Zhou Enlai what he thought about the impact of the French Revolution on history, to which the Chinese leader responded “It’s too soon to tell.” Something similar holds for the trade policy conclusions of the July 7-8 G20 summit in Hamburg. …Read More

For both Germany and the United States, China has become a foreign policy priority: a major strategic competitor in the Asia-Pacific region for the United States, and a willing partner on the topic of trade, technological development, and climate change for Germany. For the next two years, the United States and Europe will be in …Read More

Page 1 of 4123...Last »