The American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr once stated that the essence of statecraft is locating the point of concurrence between the parochial and the general interest, between the national and international common good.[1] Niebuhr emphasizes that realism implies an obligation to see the world as it actually is, not as we might like it to be. He warned that hubris can blind realism, finding expression in outsized confidence in both the power as well as the values of a country as being universal. Any country is susceptible to such temptations.

Transatlantic relations play an important role in how the West reacts to the challenges of the twenty-first century, and certain measures must be taken to maintain the relationship under the new U.S. administration.  This is the focus of Karl Kaiser’s recent article for International Politik und Gesellschaft, Demolition Enterprise Trump: A Manual for Saving the …Read More

The American Council on Germany (ACG) and AICGS were pleased to host a breakfast discussion as part of the 2017 Munich Security Conference with Dr. Norbert Röttgen, Chairman of the Bundestag’s Foreign Relations Committee, and General David Petraeus, former Director of the CIA.  The off-the-record discussion touched on the challenges confronting the German-American relationship in …Read More

There is a well-known warning to all politicians seeking to sound convincing to their audiences: if you have to explain too much, you are losing them. If there are too many ambiguities in a message, you trip yourself up justifying them. The platform of the Munich Security Conference is a tough testing ground for all politicians given the enormous concentration on what is discussed there. This year’s meeting was no exception.

The Munich Security Conference has had many memorable milestones over the last half century; I have been privileged to experience several. The famous “I am not convinced” exchange between Joschka Fischer and Donald Rumsfeld in 2003; the gauntlet directed at the U.S. by Vladimir Putin in 2007; Joachim Gauck’s challenge to Germany for it to rethink …Read More

It is not the first time the Bundeswehr is engaged in the Baltic States. For a number of years, the German air force has participated as a rotating member in NATO’s Baltic Air Policing mission. But the new presence of the Bundeswehr in the German-led NATO battalion marks a sea change in German security policy: …Read More

The Munich Security Conference convenes at a time of the great unraveling of the world order.   The world is less stable and more uncertain than it has been for years. Conflicts and crises rage across Europe, the Middle East, and Asia from Ukraine and Syria to ISIL, and in the South China Sea.  The rise …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Germany Should Not Fear Trump (Handelsblatt Global) Should German carmakers be alarmed? (DW) Bank of England Governor: Bank will protect economic growth (U.S.News) IMF boosts growth forecast for US, cites Trump impact (Southern Business Journal) U.S. Ambassadors in Asia make …Read More

I’ll admit it. I did not expect to be writing a piece with this title. Like so many on both sides of the Atlantic, I did not expect Donald Trump to win on November 8. But he did. So now committed Atlanticists need to get to work and start sketching out a common transatlantic agenda …Read More

Germany and nine of its NATO/EU allies and partners will continue relying on Russian and Ukrainian An-124 aircraft to transport heavy and outsize loads in support of their international military and humanitarian relief operations, despite NATO’s 2014 decision to suspend all practical military and civilian cooperation with Russia.  Because of Ukraine’s refusal to continue its …Read More

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