Please consider sponsoring a table or seat at the 20th Annual AICGS Global Leadership Award Dinner on Monday, December 15, 2014 in NYC. This year we will honor Michael Diekmann, Chairman of the Board of Management of Allianz SE (CEO) at a gala dinner. The dinner will be preceded by the third Annual AICGS Symposium.

AICGS congratulates Virginia M. Rometty, Chairman, President, and CEO of IBM, on receiving the 2013 Global Leadership Award from the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies (AICGS). Each year, AICGS recognizes the achievements of business pioneers and government leaders who have profoundly shaped the partnership between Germany and the United States. The award highlights the …Read More

AICGS inaugurated the Global Leadership Award in 1994 to support the Institute’s mission of fostering understanding and closer ties between the United States and Germany. The Award recognizes the achievements of business pioneers and government leaders who have profoundly shaped the partnership between Germany and the United States.

Germany’s struggle to understand and to define its global responsibilities through the euro crisis, Afghanistan, and now Libya has taken the country’s policy course through more turns than in the Nürburgring racetrack, writes Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel, vice president at DePaul University and a regular contributor to the Advisor. Because of its unclear policies, Germany faces the challenge of being sidelined when the danger of the moment in the Middle East urgently needs European leadership, Bindenagel argues. This essay originally appeared in the May 18, 2011, edition of Süddeutsche Zeitung.

Little more than a year after the passage of the Lisbon Treaty, the E.U. faces a much dimmer future, writes Doug Bandow, Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and a regular contributor to the Advisor. The EU’s objective of becoming the globe’s third “Weltmacht,” alongside America and China, looks ever more like a fantasy, Bandow argues, especially as the financial crisis threatens European unity. This essay originally appeared in the author’s blog on Forbes online on February 7, 2011.