The results of the September 24 elections—losses by centrist parties and gains by a strong new far-right party—and the subsequent inability of party leaders to forge a coalition in Berlin should be a wakeup call for German politicians of all stripes. 

From an economic standpoint, the most important thing that was at stake in the September 24 German elections was how strongly the new governing coalition that emerged from the vote would commit to shock-proofing the euro.

A first post-election poll published by Forschungsgruppe Wahlen reveals three important findings regarding the German public’s assessment of the choices they made in the Bundestag election. General dissatisfaction with the results of the election: 66% of Germans polled are displeased with the results of the vote compared to only 28% who are pleased. This compares …Read More

“Everything must change so that everything can stay the same.” So wrote Lampedusa in The Leopard about a Sicilian aristocracy coping with revolutions in nineteenth century Italy. But this phrase could apply to twenty-first century Germany as well. Lampedusa’s insight was not that the clock could be stopped to produce some kind of political stasis. …Read More

The results of the German election will have important implications for Europe and the transatlantic relationship. Here is a first take on what this means for transatlantic relations. Chancellor Merkel would win this week’s version of the Washington Post’s Worst Week award. The key take away from Sunday’s election is that Merkel was substantially weakened, …Read More

The Left Party (Die Linke) is the story of the last twenty-seven years since German unification. It has been the largest of the three smaller parties in the Bundestag during the past four years—bigger than the Greens and the Christian Social Union. Its base is largely in the eastern German states; the party heads the …Read More

The consensus on this week’s election in Germany is that it has been a boring campaign, it’s outcome a done deal, and that we can all look forward to four more years of Chancellor Angela Merkel. However, this may turn out to be one of the least predictable elections in recent German history.  It is …Read More

On September 24, Angela Merkel is likely to match former chancellor Helmut Kohl by winning a fourth election to become Chancellor of Germany. Following that, the question is: what will be the color of her coalition? It’s possible that after the election she will govern Germany with a third version of coalition partners—a remarkable display of …Read More

One of the peculiarities of the German political landscape is the role of the Christian Social Union (CSU). A party whose reach is confined to the borders of Bavaria, it has been a major force within the national framework of the Federal Republic of Germany ever since it emerged out of the reconstruction of political parties …Read More

The German elections are just over two weeks away on September 24.  Chancellor Angela Merkel is nearly certain to be reelected to a fourth term, so the main unknown surrounds her choice of coalition partner(s). Will it be another grand coalition with the left-of-center Social Democrats (the SPD may wish some time in opposition), two-party …Read More

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