Foreign policy issues will not play a major role in the decision of most Germans when they go to vote on September 24, yet the campaign which now has opened “the hot phase” has revealed that the future of German defense spending and Germany’s role in European security will be an issue. On defense, the …Read More

Germany is emerging as a major defense player in Europe. With the UK leaving the EU, Germany and France are now leading Europe’s efforts to secure the continent. The Cipher Brief’s Kaitlin Lavinder talked with Stephen Szabo, a senior fellow at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies, about Franco-German defense coordination and Germany’s new …Read More

German-Turkish relations, experiencing their fair share of turbulence in the past months, reached a new low last Wednesday when Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cabinet decided to redeploy some 260 German soldiers and Tornado surveillance as well as tanker planes that have been stationed at Turkey’s Incirlik airbase since December 2015 to Jordan. According to defense minister …Read More

Wolfgang Ischinger knows German foreign policy. He was the country’s deputy foreign minister from 1998 to 2001. He was its ambassador to Washington from 2001 to 2006. Then he spent two years as its man in London. Since then he has been chair of the Munich Security Conference (MSC), the world’s most important independent gathering …Read More

In an interview with Deutschlandfunk Kultur‘s Ute Welty, AICGS President Jack Janes weighs in on Trump’s first 100 days and what it suggests for transatlantic relations going forward. Listen to the Interview

Amid confusion and disorientation regarding the Trump administration’s new foreign and security policy, Europe is reflecting on its security challenges at home and abroad in a new era. After the successful closing of this year’s Munich Security Conference, AICGS President Dr. Jackson Janes sits down with Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the MSC and AICGS Trustee, …Read More

The American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr once stated that the essence of statecraft is locating the point of concurrence between the parochial and the general interest, between the national and international common good.[1] Niebuhr emphasizes that realism implies an obligation to see the world as it actually is, not as we might like it to be. He warned that hubris can blind realism, finding expression in outsized confidence in both the power as well as the values of a country as being universal. Any country is susceptible to such temptations.

The Munich Security Conference has had many memorable milestones over the last half century; I have been privileged to experience several. The famous “I am not convinced” exchange between Joschka Fischer and Donald Rumsfeld in 2003; the gauntlet directed at the U.S. by Vladimir Putin in 2007; Joachim Gauck’s challenge to Germany for it to rethink …Read More

Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, has to have a broad horizon when looking at the world, as he shows in his latest book, A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order. We need a new operating system to manage the “disarray” in the global arena …Read More

With U.S. President Donald Trump poised to pull the United States back from global leadership and with the United Kingdom mired in a messy withdrawal from the European Union, Germany has emerged as the central economic and political power in Europe. Since German President Joachim Gauck’s much-lauded speech at the Munich Security Conference in 2014—“Let …Read More

Page 1 of 47123...10...Last »