The most important contribution the new German Federal Government can make is to support and reform the global economic order that has been responsible for 70 years of peace and prosperity. Whether it is through institutions like the World Trade Organization and the European Union, countless bilateral trade agreements, or the informal norms and principles …Read More

All eyes will be on Donald Trump when he attends the international summits of NATO and the G7 at the end of May. On his first trip to Europe he is also set to meet the presidents of the European Council and the European Commission, Donald Tusk and Jean-Claude Juncker. Policymakers in Brussels and across …Read More

There is no doubt that the transatlantic relationship is facing one of its most difficult tests since the days of the Marshall Plan. For most of this time, the most serious challenge to the relationship came from the outside, namely from the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact. Today, while there is continued outside pressure …Read More

After President Trump’s withdrawal from the Transpacific Partnership (TPP) and with the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations “in the freezer,” the future of free trade agreements is put into question. However, trade agreements remain an important tool not only to create jobs and economic growth, but also to develop, update, and enforce the …Read More

In the last sixty years, the institutionalized cooperation between sovereign nation states in Europe has been a major success. Underpinned by a U.S. commitment to the defense of Europe, European integration has delivered the longest period of peace and prosperity across most of Europe since the times of the Roman Empire. However, sixty years after the …Read More

In the face of growing challenges to an open, rules-based global economic order, there is a need to identify new ideas and narratives about the importance of international economic engagement for the United States, Germany, and the European Union. Ahead of the G20 summit in Hamburg in July under the current German presidency, AICGS will …Read More

Hardly any economist would have disagreed if Peter Navarro, new chief trade adviser to President Trump, had just restated the standard textbook wisdom: that a common currency cannot fit well the diverging needs of economies that are hit by asymmetric shocks. But Mr. Navarro’s statement was significantly more original, claiming that Germany is using a …Read More

As Germany assumes the Presidency of the G20 largest world economies, a new U.S. president takes office, and uncertainties surround the future of the global economic order, the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies at Johns Hopkins University is launching a new Geoeconomics Project in 2017. Peter S. Rashish, who counts over 25 years of …Read More

In the current climate of rising populism—or what Mark Blyth calls “global Trumpism”—the United States and Germany remain key engines of the global economy. While Germany has long been admired for its export-led model, the United States is a powerhouse of household consumption. But both economies are vulnerable to problems endemic to their growth models. …Read More

The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-09 ended a two-decade period of steady economic growth and stable inflation in the world’s advanced markets, the so-called “Great Moderation.”[1] Since the mid-1980s, this long-term stabilization in macroeconomic indicators had provided the grounds for continuous cross-border integration across financial markets, trade relations, and societies, giving way to an unprecedented …Read More

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