On August 25, 2016, DAAD/AICGS Research Fellow Colleen Anderson presented her research on international space exploration in East and West Germany in a seminar at AICGS. She explored the historical background of German rocketry programs, examined German imaginations of space exploration in the early postwar period, and described the nature of East and West German …Read More

Congratulations to Dr. William G. Gray of Purdue University, the recipient of the 2015 DAAD Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in German and European Studies, for his outstanding academic work in the field of Politics and International Relations. Dr. Gray is one of the leading American Cold War historians, and profoundly knowledgeable on German politics and …Read More

Guenter Schabowski, a senior East German official whose cryptic announcement that the communist country was opening its fortified border precipitated the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, died Nov. 1 in a Berlin nursing home. He was 86. His widow, Irina Schabowski, confirmed his death to the German news agency Deutsche Presse-Agentur. Mr. Schabowski, …Read More

Eight months after the Berlin Wall came down, Deutsche Bank returned to Eastern Germany. Our bank was founded in Berlin in 1870, but Soviet forces had closed all our branches in their zone of occupation following World War II.

When Germany’s leaders gather on October 3 for the 25th anniversary of German unification, they will celebrate the progress they have made in integrating the eastern and western parts of the country and will likely also speak of the work still to be done in the ongoing process of unification. If last year’s festivities surrounding the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall are any indication, they will also praise the courageous East Germans for their Peaceful Revolution of 1989-90 and draw attention to the vast changes people in the east have experienced in transitioning into a very different system in the Federal Republic of Germany.

This June, the G-7 will meet in an opulent castle near Germany’s highest mountain, the Zugspitze. It was initially built, according to the host’s website, for an “egocentric zealot” who sought to convert Jews to Christianity. Schloss Elmau has since become a spa and cultural center, but the lofty location seems somehow like an appropriate …Read More

As Francis Fukuyama describes in his latest book, Political Order and Political Decay, there is a vicious cycle within modern liberal democracies that is apparent today: a feedback loop of distrust and disappointment in government and its leaders, undercutting the ability and authority of government to meet expectations, disappointing citizens more and creating greater distrust. …Read More

Andrew Port

Andrew I. Port is an associate professor of history at Wayne State University in Detroit. He previously taught as a Lecturer at Harvard and at Yale, and also worked as a Project Coordinator at the Office of Human Rights in Nuremberg, Germany. He received a Ph.D. in modern European history from Harvard, a B.A. in history …Read More

This week Germany again marks its anniversary of formal unification on October 3. Next month, on November 9, we will remember how the division of Germany ended, seeing dramatic pictures of jubilant people sitting atop the Berlin Wall twenty-five years ago. A quarter century has passed by in the blink of an historical eye. Germans …Read More

b_maleck

Bernhard Maleck has been teaching at IES Abroad Berlin since 1995. Previously, he has taught at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Johns Hopkins University, and was the recipient of a Fellowship for research at the John F. Kennedy Institute of North American Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin. He also served as Academic Advisor for …Read More

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