This video amasses the recommendations for transatlantic civil society arrived at by a group of four young Germans and four young Americans over this past year. The focus of the group’s discussion was the role of civil society in reconciliation at a time of uncertainty. The group looked at both the bilateral German-American relationship and …Read More

Current discussions about the role and force of civil society in different countries around the world mark a situation in which democratic structures are in various ways endangered by political movements or political leaders. A paper of leading German and international welfare organizations criticizes this development: An independent, lively, and critical civil society is the …Read More

How to keep young Americans interested in Germany is one of the key questions in maintaining solid U.S.-German relations for future generations to come. The nature of the asymmetric relationship has always meant that more young Germans have been interested in the U.S. than their counterparts in America toward Germany (this is quite common in …Read More

Germany has become the “leader of the free world.” It didn’t ask for the role and it doesn’t want it, but it was thrust upon Germany by the sheer lack of alternatives. The position was long jealously guarded by the United States, and the role fit it—albeit with a hefty dose of hypocrisy, like most …Read More

The transatlantic relationship is undergoing a fundamental shift in that the idea of the West as a community of values and interests is in question—not only since the election of the new U.S. president and Brexit, but also since populist forces have gained ground on the European continent. The last year has revealed a fundamental …Read More

Panel Discussion at the German Historical Institute. Speakers: Kathleen Canning (University of Michigan), Rüdiger Graf (Center for Contemporary History Potsdam), Donna Harsch (Carnegie Mellon University), and Dirk Schumann (University of Göttingen), and moderated by David Clay Large (University of San Francisco/University of California, Berkeley) This panel will bring together Weimar historians to address the history …Read More

With the ripple effect of Donald Trump’s election still being felt not only in the U.S., but all over the world, many are scrambling to find explanations for how that happened. One widespread explanation is the rise of a populist surge—against parties, politics, and so-called powerful elites. But in order to understand how it happened, …Read More

This text was originally presented at a public lecture at the  University of Pretoria, South Africa, on February 15, 2017. Introduction One might reasonably ask what is actually special about Donald Trump and the Trump presidency. After all, it is not populism in public office that is new. Neither is Donald Trump the first narcissist …Read More

In January, Germany’s Federal Statistical Office (Statistisches Bundesamt) announced that the country’s population is likely growing again—a direct result of an increase in immigration since 2012.  The latest preliminary survey results indicate that approximately 82.8 million people lived in Germany at the end of 2016. This is an increase of 0.6 million compared to the …Read More

“This is how the Americans truly are…” is a sentence we keep hearing in Germany these days. We keep trying to summarize people from or living in certain countries as one homogeneous group—“The Polish,” “The Russians,” or “The Israelis.” We think that they look, think, and behave in certain ways even as we usually dislike …Read More

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