The British EU-referendum of 2016 resulted in a 51.9 percent majority in favor of Brexit. There are, however, serious doubts about whether this referendum was an orderly one. One can also raise the issue of why the anti-EU immigration rhetoric of both the Cameron and May governments was so misleading: They argued that immigration from …Read More

When Angela Merkel delivered her shot over the bow toward Washington, DC, following her encounter with Donald Trump, it was not only aimed at that city but also across the English Channel. Her comments were kept generic, “the times in which we could fully rely on others are to a certain extent over,” but then …Read More

AICGS is pleased to present the written results of the first year of its new project “A German-American Dialogue of the Next Generation: Global Responsibility, Joint Engagement.” The six authors together with several other young Americans and Germans engaged with each other during the course of several months in 2016/17 in discussions to identify solutions …Read More

In a widely-read interview with the German daily tabloid Bild just days before his inauguration, Donald Trump called the British decision to leave the EU “smart,” and predicted that other member states would follow suit.[1] The spectacle of Europe’s strongest ally, the United States, calling into question the value of the EU—the model of the …Read More

March 29, 2017 marks an historic day for Europe: The British government has handed over the official letter for exiting the European Union to EU president Donald Tusk. This move, the so-called Brexit, is an important event in EU integration—perhaps a watershed. So far, the integration process has been marked by continuous deepening toward an …Read More

Wolfgang Muno

Dr. Wolfgang Muno is a DAAD/AICGS Research Fellow in March and April 2017. He is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Mainz (habilitation 2015) and Acting Professor of International Relations and Comparative Political Systems at University of Landau. Previously, he was Acting Professor of International Relations at Zeppelin University, Friedrichshafen, and Acting Professor for …Read More

Germany has emerged as the EU’s central economic and political power in today’s crisis-ridden Europe. The U.K., after the Brexit vote, has probably dropped out of global crisis management for quite a while and the United States, under President Barack Obama, already significantly retrenched from global commitments. Thus the election of Donald Trump marks a …Read More

2016 has seen significant upheaval and sets the stage for an even bumpier 2017. Leading up to national elections in several major European economies—Germany, France, the Netherlands, and potentially Italy—voters and politicians alike are watching closely to see how Britain’s economy fares as Brexit plays out. The average individual has personally felt few effects of …Read More

2016 As a Special Year for the UK and the U.S. The UK experienced a rather surprising victory by the supporters of Brexit—i.e., those in favor of the UK leaving the European Union. The British referendum result of a majority in favor of Brexit was indeed a surprise to most observers, however, not really to …Read More

The future European security architecture will be decided on two questions: Will the EU and the UK choose the path of a hard line to demonstrate EU unity on the one hand and British strength on the other, or will they follow a pragmatic approach to protect and perpetuate important security relations? What impact will …Read More

Page 1 of 3123