Our research projects provide the analytical tools and concepts to understand changes in the German-American relationship and emerging issues on the transatlantic agenda.

It is said that Mark Twain once commented, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Maybe a more accurate version is that history doesn’t repeat itself, but people often do—for better or for worse. Over the past seventy years, German and American leadership has been defined by shared interests and objectives. Despite any number …Read More

The hometown Washington Redskins may have just missed making it to the playoffs of the National Football League championships this season. But they showed once again how important a strong offense is to success, especially when the team’s defense is not performing at a world-class level. What is true for professional sports also holds for …Read More

Donald Trump’s election as American president is the latest and most dramatic sign of a major political and social sea change, the effect of which we are just beginning to understand. The break with the past has been so dramatic that Europe too risks being engulfed in a wave of the sort of populism which …Read More

Of the U.S.’ trade policy and trade relationships over the past twenty-five years, Robert Zoellick, former World Bank president, U.S. Trade Representative, deputy Secretary of State, and AICGS Trustee, writes in the New York Times that “Today’s new conventional wisdom is that trade is bad politics. But the fall of the Soviet Union showed that …Read More

Populist parties and governments have gained in popularity in many countries across the world in recent months. Their success is in part based on citizens’ fear of globalization, immigrants, loss of identity, diversification of the population, and economic hardship. In 2016, the United Kingdom voted to leave the Europe Union and the United States voted …Read More

The question of Europe’s ability to stabilize its neighborhood and even to defend its own territory was high on the agenda this year. The election of Donald Trump—who repeatedly questioned the relevance of NATO on the campaign trail—again underlined the need for Europeans to invest more in their own defense capabilities. In an interview, Trump …Read More

After the events of 2016, the future of the transatlantic relationship at times seems tenuous, fraught with national interests and publics that seem tired of looking beyond one’s own borders. As leaders in the U.S. and Europe navigate through uncertain waters, they will do well to remember two important milestones in transatlantic relations: the announcement …Read More

2016 As a Special Year for the UK and the U.S. The UK experienced a rather surprising victory by the supporters of Brexit—i.e., those in favor of the UK leaving the European Union. The British referendum result of a majority in favor of Brexit was indeed a surprise to most observers, however, not really to …Read More

The future European security architecture will be decided on two questions: Will the EU and the UK choose the path of a hard line to demonstrate EU unity on the one hand and British strength on the other, or will they follow a pragmatic approach to protect and perpetuate important security relations? What impact will …Read More

Donald Trump has tapped anger over eroding middle class income, loss of identity, and anti-establishment fervor in a campaign of anger that won the Electoral College vote and the presidency of the United States. Trump stoked the fires of fear of immigrants and Muslims and insulted the military, the handicapped, women, and others. He shamelessly …Read More

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