The inability to accept the past by Japanese leaders stands in stark contrast to Germany’s clear acknowledgment of its responsibility for the Holocaust. The deep layers of reconciliation Germany developed with France, Poland, Israel, and the Czech Republic stand in contrast to Japan’s apologies to its neighbors, which have been thin, intermittent, and devoid of follow-up in bilateral policies toward China and South Korea that show a genuine desire to make amends. Germany’s experience—apologize, offer compensation, build other relationship—can serve as a guideline for continuing reconciliation in East Asia.

Julie Hamann is research fellow at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP). Her areas of focus are Franco-German relations, German and French foreign policy, and labor unions and social movements in France. She manages the Franco-German Future Dialogue. She studied political science and sociology at the Technische Universität Dresden and at the Institut d’Études …Read More

Annika Frieberg

Originally from Sweden, Annika Frieberg studied Modern and Central European History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She teaches courses in 19th and 20th century European and East European history at San Diego State University. Her research and teaching interests center on war and genocide, gender, conflict resolution, media, national, and transnational questions in Central Europe. …Read More

Felix Berenskötter is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations at SOAS, University of London. He specializes in international theory; concepts of friendship, identity, power, security, peace, space and time; European security and transatlantic relations. Following his undergraduate studies in Hamburg, Felix received a Masters Degree from Rutgers University, where he was a Fulbright Scholar, …Read More

Dan Plesch’s new book, Human Rights after Hitler: The Lost History of Prosecuting Axis War Crimes, sheds light on the existence of a little-known agency founded amid the atrocities of World War II: the United Nations War Crimes Commission (UNWCC). Predating Nuremberg, the Rwandan tribunals, and Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court, the UNWCC identified, …Read More

Nguyen Luong Hai Khoi

Dr. Nguyen Luong Hai Khoi was a Harry & Helen Gray/AICGS Reconciliation Fellow in August and September 2017.  He completed his PhD dissertation in the field of Japanese non-dual aesthetics at the Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan, in 2014 and was a postdoc at the Hiroshima University, Japan, in 2015. He is the Director of Department …Read More

Reconciliation processes in Asia face a number of challenges at the official level. However, at the level of civil society some progress is being made. The seminar will look at NGOs’ activities in Japan-Korea relations and at art in Japan-Vietnam relations to assess the potential for reconciliation today. In this seminar, Harry & Helen Gray/AICGS …Read More

Dan Plesch’s new book, Human Rights after Hitler: The Lost History of Prosecuting Axis War Crimes, sheds light on the existence of a little-known agency founded amid the atrocities of World War II: the United Nations War Crimes Commission (UNWCC). Predating Nuremberg, the Rwandan tribunals, and Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court, the UNWCC identified, …Read More

The genocide of the Herero and Nama, committed between 1904 and 1908 under German colonial rule in today’s Namibia, is considered the first genocide of the 20th century. Over the past decades and especially since the commemoration of the 100 years of the genocide in 2004, when the German government refused to recognize the crimes …Read More

Working for reconciliation between Israel and the Palestinians is arduous but rewarding—it keeps providing glimmers of hope in a situation that often seems beyond hopeless politically, motivating us to persevere. But how can it be done? Friendship Across Borders works for reconciliation in small groups of Israelis, Palestinians, and Germans in intensive seminars that try …Read More

Agnieszka Batko

Agnieszka Batko was a Harry & Helen Gray/AICGS Reconciliation Fellow in August and September 2017. She holds an MA in International Relations from Jagiellonian University (JU) and is currently pursuing her PhD degree in Political Science at JU. She also studied at Griffith University in Australia and University of Hull in the United Kingdom. Prior …Read More

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