The millennial generation in Europe and the United States has come of age in a rapidly changing global environment. While some characterize this generation as narcissistic and self-entitled, others argue that these “digital natives” are intensely engaged in an increasingly diverse, connected world. It is important to expand the transatlantic dialogue by incorporating the perspectives of millennials and young minorities as they develop their own solutions to emerging global challenges.

In his essay for LSE IDEAS’ Special Report “New Challenges, New Voices: Next Generation Viewpoints on Transatlantic Relations,” AICGS Senior Research Associate Parke Nicholson offers his views on the future of the transatlantic relationship. Many fear the transatlantic partnership is drifting apart. Disputes over policy, privacy, and security make it seem like the community of …Read More

For the eighth straight year, the Koerber Stiftung’s Munich Young Leaders (MYL) Program brought together twenty-five foreign and security policy professionals under the age of 40 for discussions with selected leaders at the 52nd Munich Security Conference. Initially meant to bridge the Cold War divide between East and West, the Stiftung itself has regularly brought …Read More

AICGS held an off-the-record workshop on December 11, 2015, to discuss the concept of power and the use of force in international affairs with twenty future German and American leaders from academia, government, and the military. The discussion resulted in various observations and debates about the nature of power in the twenty-first century and the …Read More

Reflecting on recent crisis in Europe as well as around the world, Dr. Felix Berenskoetter recalls the evolution of German power and influence since WWII and suggests that Germany is continuing to adapt to its new leadership position to satisfy its responsibilities and meet new challenges.

In 2014, Lower Saxony became the last German state to completely waive tuition fees for all students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. This move comes at a time when student debt in the United States has exceeded credit card debt, totaling $1.3 trillion, and as students and their parents shell out thousands of dollars …Read More

DAAD Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in German and European Studies Politics and International Relations Every year, the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies (AICGS) awards the DAAD Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in German and European Studies in recognition of exceptional work in one of the Institute’s three major areas of research: Foreign & Domestic Policy …Read More

This new report from the Atlantic Council focuses on young people in Germany and the United States, the “Next Generation.” The report analyzes traditional themes in German-American relations as well as emerging issues, including equality, transparency, and diversity, from a younger perspective. Its Next Generation Strategy makes recommendations on transatlantic cooperation to face challenges in …Read More

In most of the developed world, birth rates have been falling.  Population decline results in economic and social strains and can even threaten national security.  Germany is a particularly severe example of this trend.  Germany has had an extremely low birth rate for decades. Its resident population is in absolute decline; its family policies have …Read More

How can we explain the idea that the September 11 attacks generated a new generation in Germany? We know that there is a 9/11 generation in the United States. They are characterized by a willingness to serve in the military, homeland security, and the intelligence services. This is unlike the Vietnam generation. We also know …Read More

DAAD/AICGS Research Fellow Dr. Daniela Schiek’s presentation on March 27, 2014, dealt with her findings after researching what she calls the “9/11 Generation” and how that event shaped our foreign policy for over a decade, triggered two wars, and, to varying extents, had a personal effect on most Americans.

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