The millennial generation in Europe and the United States has come of age in a rapidly changing global environment. While some characterize this generation as narcissistic and self-entitled, others argue that these “digital natives” are intensely engaged in an increasingly diverse, connected world. It is important to expand the transatlantic dialogue by incorporating the perspectives of millennials and young minorities as they develop their own solutions to emerging global challenges.

The transatlantic partnership is currently in a state of uncertainty. Not only the transition from President Obama to President Trump, but also the populist eruption in many European countries reflects a conservative wave moving across U.S. and European politics. The societal divide phenomenon on both sides of the Atlantic challenges the transatlantic relationship more than …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Geoeconomics The E.U.-Japan Trade Deal: What’s in It and Why It Matters (New York Times) Why Germany’s current-account surplus is bad for the world economy (The Economist) Erste Festnahme im Dieselskandal (Der Spiegel) Domestic and Foreign Policy Merkel calls for greater investment in …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Geoeconomics The European Commission levies a huge fine on Google (The Economist) ‘Pharma bro’ Shkreli’s trial begins as ex-pharma CEO faces allegations of cheating investors (Deutsche Welle) GE CEO criticizes President Trump on China and the Paris Accords (The Atlantic) Foreign and Domestic …Read More

AICGS is pleased to present two essays from the second round of the AICGS New Transatlantic Exchange Program: Giving Voice to Diversity. This innovative program establishes new connections between communities in Germany and the United States that have grown principally from an immigration background, and addresses common challenges of immigration and integration, such as discrimination, …Read More

The United States is fast abandoning leadership of the liberal world order. The withdrawal of the U.S. from the recently negotiated and signed Paris Agreement is the latest self-inflicted wound. Many Americans, however, are not happy with Trump’s decision and they are determined to advance a progressive environmental agenda at the local, state, and regional …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Geoeconomics How Chinese overcapacity hits American workers (The Economist) Campaigning for a ‘Strong and Stable’ German Economy (The Wall Street Journal) What the German economic model can teach Emmanuel Macron (The Economist) Germany threatens retaliation if U.S. sanctions harm its firms (Reuters) Foreign …Read More

This video amasses the recommendations for transatlantic civil society arrived at by a group of four young Germans and four young Americans over this past year. The focus of the group’s discussion was the role of civil society in reconciliation at a time of uncertainty. The group looked at both the bilateral German-American relationship and …Read More

Current discussions about the role and force of civil society in different countries around the world mark a situation in which democratic structures are in various ways endangered by political movements or political leaders. A paper of leading German and international welfare organizations criticizes this development: An independent, lively, and critical civil society is the …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Geoeconomics Bavaria to Trump: Tariffs on cars will hurt US as much as Germany (Politico) German grocer Lidl enters US market (Deutsche Welle) A new paper rekindles a tiresome debate on immigration and wages (The Economist)  Central bank raises rates, plans to shrink …Read More

How to keep young Americans interested in Germany is one of the key questions in maintaining solid U.S.-German relations for future generations to come. The nature of the asymmetric relationship has always meant that more young Germans have been interested in the U.S. than their counterparts in America toward Germany (this is quite common in …Read More

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