Germany’s leadership outside of Europe and recent interventions to stabilize the international system have been a significant source of tension. Debates over the changing global balance of power, political instability, transnational conflict, and the use of new technologies and methods of warfare will continue to occupy elected leaders. The debate on international security must incorporate both U.S. and European perspectives, but also take note of other powers including Russia and China.

As the U.S. presidental election in 2008 and the German parliamentary election in 2009 loom large on the horizon, the topic of Afghanistan and the joint ISAF mission in the country is in the public discourse on both sides of the Atlantic. The U.S. finds itself overstreched in resources—both military and economic—and engaged in two complex wars. While the unpopular Iraq War is the focus of much debate, the conflict in Afghanistan continues, with successes and setbacks, for the United States and its NATO partners…

German and American relations with Russia; European and American energy security; and the future of NATO and the European Union are all pressing issues which will confront the new U.S. president in 2009. Germany, in the lead-up to its parliamentary elections in fall 2009, has its own interests in all three areas…

Security issues have weighed heavily on the transatlantic partnership since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Yet different threat perceptions have sometimes led to different German and American policies, which was especially apparent after the rift between Germany and the United States over the war in Iraq in 2003…

In the run-up to the NATO summit meeting in Bucharest in early April, the Bush administration has launched an intensive diplomatic campaign to convince the European allies to send additional combat troops to southern Afghanistan. This is largely to overcome the troop shortfalls facing the alliance in fighting the Taliban insurgency and to increase the allies’ operational flexibility…

Speaking of the European Union as an international actor dealing with North Korea (the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, DPRK) often raises eyebrows. Since the outbreak of the second nuclear crisis in October 2002, Brussels has played virtually no significant role in the international efforts to convince Pyongyang to abandon its nuclear weapons program…

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s recent announcement that he would accept the nomination to head the United Russia ticket in the parliamentary elections in December has been only the latest in a series of surprising reports out of Russia..

In the borderless world of the twenty-first century, global interconnectivity has never been greater. Through the use of millions of computers, billions of e-mails, and a level of personal and product mobility never known before, the amount of information racing around the globe is incalculable…

On 29 March 2006 the United Nations Security Council for the first time addressed the issue of Iranian non-compliance with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Since the wording of the presidential statement, which had been heavily disputed among the five permanent members of the Security Council (P5), has been significantly watered-down, the statement does not predetermine any specific future action by the Security Council. For the moment, it is hard to predict whether the Security Council could agree on any more resolute steps should Iran refuse to cooperate…

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