Germany’s leadership outside of Europe and recent interventions to stabilize the international system have been a significant source of tension. Debates over the changing global balance of power, political instability, transnational conflict, and the use of new technologies and methods of warfare will continue to occupy elected leaders. The debate on international security must incorporate both U.S. and European perspectives, but also take note of other powers including Russia and China.

Are the Americans the only ones who can talk seriously about how to help the Libyans and to maintain global balance? AICGS Trustee Ambassador John Kornblum, former U.S. Ambassador to Germany, ponders this question knowing that it is going to stay that way for the foreseeable future based on the perception that Europe cannot meet the new security challenges. Kornblum argues that a new strategy for Atlantic relations must be developed that demonstrates how Western values can help master the practical problems of globalization. The German version of this essay originally appeared in the March 8, 2011, edition of Die Welt.

Whether Muammar Qaddafi manages to maintain power in Libya or not, there will be no going back to the old order in the region, writes Dr. Ian Lesser, Senior Transatlantic Fellow at The German Marshall Fund of the United States and a regular participant in AICGS events. Libya looks set for a protracted period of turmoil, Dr. Lesser argues, and the strategic implications for North Africa, the Mediterranean, and transatlantic partners could be profound. This essay originally appeared in the blog of The German Marshall Fund of the United States.

In this week’s At Issue, Executive Director Dr. Jackson Janes examines the political earthquake in Egypt and the challenges ahead post-Mubarak – not only for Egyptians but for Europe and the United States in assisting the transformations in a new era for Egypt and the Middle East.

Nearly ten years after the first decision on a military commitment in Afghanistan, this week the Bundestag will again debate the renewal of the mandate for the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). Former DAAD/AICGS Fellow Dr. Markus Kaim examines the internal debate over whether or not a concrete withdrawal date should be included in the mandate and suggests some potential scenarios for the overall Afghanistan mission as the decision approaches. This essay originally appeared in the January 24, 2011, edition of Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and is available in German only.

State Secretary Dr. Werner Hoyer, MdB (FDP), discusses with Dr. Jackson Janes the foreign policy challenges facing Germany in the upcoming year, including Iran, the financial crisis, Belarus, and the Hungarian EU presidency.

During the Cold War, Germany and the U.S. fostered close arms cooperation and development. Yet, after German unification, Germany focused on developing and procuring armament systems either domestically or within the EU. In Policy Report #46, Senior Non-Resident Fellow Alexander Ritzmann argues that German-American defense cooperation could once again become an area in which transatlantic cooperation helps to overcome challenges. Ritzmann offers some concrete policy recommendations to the U.S. and German governments to increase transatlantic defense cooperation and outlines what has led to the current lack of cooperation.

DAAD/AICGS Fellow Ms. Constance Baban explores the impact of the idea of the European Union as an area of freedom, security, and justice on Germany’s domestic security policy in the context of 9/11, and how the challenges of ‘Europeanization’ have been confronted within Germany’s security policy debate. Ms. Baban discusses actual changes in domestic security policy, but also focuses on the political and media discourse and how this has affected the outcome of several security policies since 9/11.

One of the most debated issues in the transatlantic partnership is the NATO mission in Afghanistan. In January 2010, the London Conference on Afghanistan brought together delegations from around the world to discuss the military engagement in Afghanistan as well as the future of the country. AICGS Research Associate Kirsten Verclas explores how this conference surrounding one of the most contested issues in the German-American partnership was covered by the German and American media and outlines the reasons behind the coverage.

The fight against terrorism has been on the forefront of the U.S. and German agendas and shapes the relationship between both countries. While cooperation has been strong, differences have arisen in several areas. In Issue Brief 35, Edna Dretzka and DAAD/AICGS Fellow Stormy-Annika Mildner examine the disagreement between the U.S. and EU over sharing private financial data in relation to terrorism. The authors look at the legal situation in the United States and the political struggles in the European Union that hamper better cooperation across the Atlantic, and offer ideas on how the two actors can overcome their differences on data-sharing and SWIFT.

The fight against terrorism has been on the forefront of the U.S. and German agendas and shapes the relationship between both countries. While differences in counterterrorism policy exist, the U.S. and Germany have also very successfully cooperated in counterterrorism measures. In Issue Brief 34, Kirsten Verclas, AICGS Research Associate, examines the cultural, economic, and financial aspects of counterterrorism policy in the United States and Germany and how these aspects are combined to shape each country’s overall strategy.

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