The U.S. and Germany struggle with integrating immigrant populations and crafting immigration policies for the twenty-first century. In Germany, cultural and religious concerns guide the debate, while in the U.S., the debate is focused on socio-economic and security concerns. Looking at policies on both sides of the Atlantic can be useful in understanding how to develop successful policies for immigration and integration, bettering both German and U.S. societies.

As the Syrian refugee crisis continues, Germany is feeling the pressure from an influx of hundreds of thousands of migrants.  On 3 February, Germany introduced a new bill that will reduce public welfare benefits in order to dissuade refugees from entering the country.  Seeking to reduce the migrant influx, Germany recently changed the status of …Read More

Anxiety over terrorism and migration is shaping the electoral dynamics in both Europe and the United States. Both of these complex challenges belie simplistic characterization (or demonization); unfortunately, the politics of fear remains compelling and bravado reassures. In the coming year, Western governments will continue to struggle with preserving open societies capable of integrating migrants …Read More

In both the United States and Germany, tensions have risen regarding the influx of refugees and relations with domestic and asylum-seeking Muslims. Early this month, President Barack Obama visited the Islamic Society of Baltimore, marking his first visit to a mosque in the U.S. during his presidency. Obama encouraged “interfaith dialogue” in order to build …Read More

Against the backdrop of the continuing refugee crisis in Europe, Josef Janning, Head of Berlin Office and Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, sits down with AICGS President Dr. Jackson Janes to discuss how Germany can manage the crisis with its European partners. Mr. Janning suggests that, lacking a broad consensus within the …Read More

Last fall at the 2015 Frankfurt Auto Show, Dr. Dieter Zetsche, Chairman of the Board at Daimler AG, Head of Mercedes-Benz, and recipient of the 2015 Global Leadership Award abruptly interrupted his speech on the future of automobiles to discuss a more pressing current issue: the hundreds of thousands of displaced refugees arriving in Germany …Read More

AICGS Non-Resident Fellow Joyce Marie Mushaben weighs in on the Cologne assaults in this blog post from CNN.

The mass assaults against women that occurred in Cologne and elsewhere on New Year’s Eve have reverberated all over Germany and indeed well beyond. The fact that most of the assailants were newly-arrived asylum seekers and other immigrants launched a tidal wave of criticism directed not only at the local authorities in Cologne, but increasingly at Angela …Read More

Immigration policymaking has attracted a great deal of interest recently. Somewhat surprisingly, there is only limited political science scholarship on the role that political parties play in the process. This might be due to the lingering impression that while the politics of immigration are often colorful, contested, and confrontational, the policymaking process is much more …Read More

In this At Issue Interview, Alexander Radwan, a CSU politician and member of the German Bundestag, discusses the current crises and challenges facing Germany and Europe, including the Greek crisis and unprecedented influx of refugees. Mr. Radwan suggests that a stronger and more powerful EU is needed to address these challenges effectively and politicians around …Read More

Introduction In “Why Islam is Like Spanish: Cultural Incorporation in Europe and the United States,” Aristide Zolberg and Long Litt Woon argue that Islam and Spanish pose cultural threats to the privileged positions of Christianity and English in Western European states and the U.S., respectively.[1] This rests on the notion that Western European states are …Read More

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