Political priorities are shaped not only by social and economic issues, but also the global arena. Balancing domestic priorities and foreign policy demands will continue to drive the discourse between the White House and Congress as well as those of the Chancellery and the Bundestag. Understanding the political landscape is essential to maintaining German-American cooperation, and making sure the partnership can adjust to new challenges.

On April 13, 2017, Dr. Wolfgang Muno, DAAD/AICGS Research Fellow in March and April 2017, presented his research on President Trump’s foreign policy and the associated repercussions for transatlantic ties in a seminar at AICGS. Dr. Muno investigated the basis of and prospects for foreign policy under Donald Trump, with special focus on the realms …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Germany Said to Seek Early U.K. Brexit Pledge to Pay Its EU Bill (Bloomberg) Trump is wrong to criticise Germany over trade – he should look closer to home (The Guardian) German firms report Brexit will ‘seriously damage’ business with …Read More

March 29, 2017 marks an historic day for Europe: The British government has handed over the official letter for exiting the European Union to EU president Donald Tusk. This move, the so-called Brexit, is an important event in EU integration—perhaps a watershed. So far, the integration process has been marked by continuous deepening toward an …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Germany to take legal action if Trump taxes imports (DW) Germany should ditch austerity, embrace EU investment: Gabriel (The Business Times) China’s Taxes on Imported Cars Feed Trade Tensions With U.S. (NYT) Business groups draw battle lines over Obamacare replacement …Read More

It was an awkward date.  Both recognized they had to get to know each other, but neither one was particularly keen to do so.  Nevertheless, they went through the motions with a sense of obligation that was painfully obvious to everyone. Trump and Merkel are not going to be friends, and they may not ever …Read More

Amid the many controversies roiling Washington these days, there is a troubling trend that is greater than the sum of the parts: America’s singular leadership role, held with minimal challenge since the end of World War II, is rapidly fading. A man who campaigned on the promise of making America great again now risks doing …Read More

Amid confusion and disorientation regarding the Trump administration’s new foreign and security policy, Europe is reflecting on its security challenges at home and abroad in a new era. After the successful closing of this year’s Munich Security Conference, AICGS President Dr. Jackson Janes sits down with Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the MSC and AICGS Trustee, …Read More

In this article in the New York Times, Dr. Jackson Janes weighs in on expectations for Merkel’s March 14 visit with Trump, noting that a number of corporate CEOs will be part of her delegation.  Dr. Janes tells the Times, “The thing she’ll come back with is, ‘Do you know that there are thousands of …Read More

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel has her first face-to-face meeting with President Trump in Washington on March 17,* she will have two key tests. Can she take the sting out of the burden sharing debate between the United States and Europe in NATO? And can the U.S. and Germany find common ground on trade policy, an …Read More

It is said that Mark Twain once commented, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Maybe a more accurate version is that history doesn’t repeat itself, but people often do—for better or for worse.

Page 10 of 43« First...91011...20...Last »