Political priorities are shaped not only by social and economic issues, but also the global arena. Balancing domestic priorities and foreign policy demands will continue to drive the discourse between the White House and Congress as well as those of the Chancellery and the Bundestag. Understanding the political landscape is essential to maintaining German-American cooperation, and making sure the partnership can adjust to new challenges.

Yogi Bera – that immortal American philosopher – once said that it is tough to make predictions, especially about the future. Well, here is one prediction. A year from now, Angela Merkel will be approaching the closing days of her election campaign, if she chooses to enter it in 2017. And she will win that …Read More

The liberal world order, a system based on open borders and open societies, is increasingly under attack. In the past, it was mainly left-wing anti-capitalists and right-wing nationalists who fulminated against globalization, while the mainstream consensus was solidly behind it. Not anymore. In the United States, the Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has declared, “Americanism, …Read More

Introduction The 2016 White Paper on German security policy is first and foremost a document reflecting a growing sense of realism with regard to the complex nature of the new and increasingly global security challenges the country has to face at home and abroad. After the week of terror in July of this year, there …Read More

Germany has not yet experienced major coordinated terror incidents of the type that has hit the United States, Belgium, France, Turkey, and other countries. Two Islamist terror attacks in Bavaria, however, shocked Germany last month. The first one was carried out by an Afghan asylum seeker who wounded four people with an ax on a …Read More

Following the two party conventions last month in Cleveland and Philadelphia, many undecided American voters and many millions watching from around the world might have concluded that they had just watched two very different movies about the United States. One depicted a country in free fall, while the other presented a picture of a promising …Read More

As I write in mid-July 2016, all the Transatlantic chatterati can seem to talk and write about—except when temporarily interrupted by terrorist outrages like the one at the Istanbul airport on June 28—is Brexit. It is as though, for some, everything was just fine in Europe before June 23. And it is all too typical …Read More

Amid an abundance of views and agendas for the future of American foreign policy in this year’s U.S. presidential campaigns, Professor Michael Mandelbaum, Professor Emeritus at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University, sits down with AICGS president Dr. Jackson Janes to discuss his recent book Mission Failure: America and the …Read More

Amid continuing uncertainties after the UK’s decision to leave the EU, AICGS President Jackson Janes sits down with Dr. Werner Hoyer, President and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the European Investment Bank, to discuss the path forward for the European project. Although the departure of the UK is a tremendous loss for the …Read More

Das Vereinigte Königreich hätte auch im Falle seines Verbleibes in der EU weiter um seine Sonderrechte gekämpft, nur ausgesuchte Projekte und Maßnahmen des Integrationswerkes akzeptiert und wäre somit ein unbequemer Partner geblieben. Der Ausgang des Referendums reflektiert neben aktuellen Sorgen breiter Kreise der britischen Bevölkerung auch alte, zum Teil Jahrhunderte alte Kräfte, die Londons Haltung …Read More

In his recent essay, AICGS Non-Resident Fellow Gunther Hellmann examines the latest debate over a “new German foreign policy.” Whereas ten years ago Germany described its foreign policy role as “playing an important part in shaping the future of Europe and beyond,” German officials lately have characterized the Federal Republic as a central actor in …Read More

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