Political priorities are shaped not only by social and economic issues, but also the global arena. Balancing domestic priorities and foreign policy demands will continue to drive the discourse between the White House and Congress as well as those of the Chancellery and the Bundestag. Understanding the political landscape is essential to maintaining German-American cooperation, and making sure the partnership can adjust to new challenges.

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Geoeconomics How Chinese overcapacity hits American workers (The Economist) Campaigning for a ‘Strong and Stable’ German Economy (The Wall Street Journal) What the German economic model can teach Emmanuel Macron (The Economist) Germany threatens retaliation if U.S. sanctions harm its firms (Reuters) Foreign …Read More

The German-American relationship has gone from Bush 41’s call for a Partnership in Leadership to Trump’s view of Germany as one of America’s adversaries.  His National Security Advisor and top economic advisor recently explained the Trump administration’s view of foreign policy: as one in which, “[T]he world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Geoeconomics Bavaria to Trump: Tariffs on cars will hurt US as much as Germany (Politico) German grocer Lidl enters US market (Deutsche Welle) A new paper rekindles a tiresome debate on immigration and wages (The Economist)  Central bank raises rates, plans to shrink …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Trump’s right about Germany (Politico) Angela Merkel should seize this change to remake Europe (The Economist) What Really Happened at VW (The Economist) Foreign and Domestic Policy As Trump Steps Back, Jerry Brown Talks Climate Change in China (New York …Read More

When Angela Merkel delivered her shot over the bow toward Washington, DC, following her encounter with Donald Trump, it was not only aimed at that city but also across the English Channel. Her comments were kept generic, “the times in which we could fully rely on others are to a certain extent over,” but then …Read More

Germany has become the “leader of the free world.” It didn’t ask for the role and it doesn’t want it, but it was thrust upon Germany by the sheer lack of alternatives. The position was long jealously guarded by the United States, and the role fit it—albeit with a hefty dose of hypocrisy, like most …Read More

AICGS is pleased to present the written results of the first year of its new project “A German-American Dialogue of the Next Generation: Global Responsibility, Joint Engagement.” The six authors together with several other young Americans and Germans engaged with each other during the course of several months in 2016/17 in discussions to identify solutions …Read More

Wolfgang Ischinger knows German foreign policy. He was the country’s deputy foreign minister from 1998 to 2001. He was its ambassador to Washington from 2001 to 2006. Then he spent two years as its man in London. Since then he has been chair of the Munich Security Conference (MSC), the world’s most important independent gathering …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Blind Spots in Trump’s Trade Tirade Against Germany (New York Times) Angela Merkel: Trump can’t stop us on Paris deal (Politico) Foreign and Domestic Policy A 30-year-old party leader is trying to remake Austria (The Economist) A polling shift suggests …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics John Kennedy and Illiberalism (AICGS) ECB plays down Brexit threat to Eurozone economy (Financial Times) OPEC Agrees to Extend Crude Output Caps (Wall Street Journal) Foreign and Domestic Politics Trump Meets NATO Officials in Brussels (NPR Morning Edition) Merkel threatens to …Read More

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