Educating the future workforce is an ongoing challenge for the United States and Europe. Lessons can be learned from other countries’ experience in developing multiple career pathways for their citizens despite national differences. This program compares the outcomes of these work-based learning systems and their role in boosting employment and economic growth.

Dr. Lukas Graf is a DAAD/AICGS Research Fellow from January to mid-March 2015 and a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Education and Society at the University of Luxembourg. His research combines comparative and historical institutional analysis as well as the sociology of education and political economy of skills. His book, The Hybridization of Vocational …Read More

The February meeting of “Learn & Earn: A Young Leaders’ Group for the Development of the U.S. Workforce” featured Jamell Thrower, Program Manager at the DC Department of Employment Services’ Office of Apprenticeship Information & Training, who was accompanied by a current apprentice. The discussion focused on the practical implementation of apprenticeship programs at the …Read More

This year’s AICGS Annual Symposium is framed around the idea of “A World in Flux”: the relative decline of the West’s economic power; the  need to  adapt our work forces to be successful in a new era; and changing geopolitics as a result of ongoing tensions in eastern Europe, the  Middle East, and Asia. Containing …Read More

If the U.S. aims to learn from the Swiss experience, it should seek ways to improve the reputation of work-based training programs through better linking the vocational and academic worlds of learning.

AICGS conducted a European study tour from October 5-15, 2014 that examined the role of apprenticeship in workforce development in Germany, France, Hungary, and the United Kingdom. Our goal was to identify best practices among employers, educators, government, and other stakeholders in preparing their current and future workforce for careers in manufacturing and information technology. …Read More

In the 2013-2014 academic year, tuition fees for undergraduate students at American universities averaged a whopping $5,410 (€4,353) each semester—and this does not include housing, dining costs, or personal expenses.1 Apart from occasional criticism and debates, tuition fees have never stirred major political protests on this side of the pond. When German students were obliged …Read More

The December meeting of “Learn & Earn: A Young Leaders’ Group for the Development of the U.S. Workforce” discussed another facet of workforce development: re-integrating military veterans into the labor market. Ms. Dana Hendrickson, Director of Outreach and Advocacy at the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), gave insights into the challenges for veterans and …Read More

In October 2014, a team led by AICGS went to France, Germany, Great Britain, and Hungary to meet with companies and other stakeholders in the apprenticeship systems. The sixth meeting of the working group “Learn & Earn: A Young Leaders’ Group for the Development of the U.S. Workforce” was convened to discuss the results of …Read More

Just off the main thoroughfare of Berlin’s Friedrichstrasse is the inconspicuous headquarters of the German Confederation of Skilled Crafts. As the tourists pose for pictures outside Checkpoint Charlie – a potent symbol of the Cold War – Dr Christian Sperle provides our delegation with a talk about Germany’s famous ‘dual system’ of vocational training. The …Read More

During our apprenticeship tour of Germany, France, and the UK, I was impressed at the respect that the general population held for apprenticeship programs. One of our taxi drivers in France was proud to tell us that his son finished his apprenticeship in construction and at the age of 21 is buying his own house …Read More

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