Educating the future workforce is an ongoing challenge for the United States and Europe. Lessons can be learned from other countries’ experience in developing multiple career pathways for their citizens despite national differences. This program compares the outcomes of these work-based learning systems and their role in boosting employment and economic growth.

This second AICGS conference focused on the theme of workforce education will convene municipal leaders and immigration and integration experts to talk about both the challenges and commitments to integrating immigrants and refugees into the workforce. In June 2015, the U.S. Department of Commerce joined with the Departments of Education and Labor to sign an …Read More

March 13 saw strong voter support in three German state elections for the anti-immigration Alternative for Germany (AfD) Party. Fueled by continuing waves of incoming refugees, anxiety is building in a country that just a decade ago started to see immigration as an opportunity. Together with its European neighbors, Germany is now facing tremendous pressure …Read More

Not only has manufacturing come back to the U.S., it has also changed in the meantime, asking for new and different skill sets compared to previous times when the U.S. had a competitive edge with products “Made in America.” The “old” manufacturing used to be dark, dirty, and dangerous; the “new” manufacturing looks very different, …Read More

Educating the future workforce is an ongoing challenge for the United States and Europe. Skills required by high-growth jobs are not necessarily being taught in traditional career paths, and there is a skills mismatch that leads to a growing shortfall of eligible workers. Germany’s apprenticeship system has successfully lowered youth unemployment and the U.S. administration …Read More

In 2014, Lower Saxony became the last German state to completely waive tuition fees for all students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. This move comes at a time when student debt in the United States has exceeded credit card debt, totaling $1.3 trillion, and as students and their parents shell out thousands of dollars …Read More

This June, the G-7 will meet in an opulent castle near Germany’s highest mountain, the Zugspitze. It was initially built, according to the host’s website, for an “egocentric zealot” who sought to convert Jews to Christianity. Schloss Elmau has since become a spa and cultural center, but the lofty location seems somehow like an appropriate …Read More

AICGS Senior Research Associate Parke Nicholson sits down with Robert Lerman, Institute Fellow at the Urban Institute and professor of economics at American University, to discuss his recent Policy Report for AICGS on the topic of workforce education in the United States and Germany.

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High youth unemployment in the United States and Europe is a result not only of sluggish growth, but also a skills mismatch—the new generation of workers lacks the skills that employers need. Economists now predict a looming shortfall of 3 million skilled U.S. workers by 2018. Meanwhile, there are 2 million job vacancies across the …Read More

In May, participants in AICGS’ working group “Learn & Earn: A Young Leaders’ Group for the Development of the U.S. Workforce” visited the Workforce Development & Lifelong Learning (WDLL) Center at the University of the District of Columbia – Community College Bertie Backus Campus. A delegation including David Lloyd, Acting Director of Student Success; Edith …Read More

Currently, many countries are experiencing a strong renewed interest in work-based training.[1] When it comes to discussions in this field, American policymakers usually identify dual apprenticeship training as the “crown jewel” of Germany’s admired skill formation system. In turn, their colleagues from Germany frequently travel to the U.S. to inform about the merits of the …Read More

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