In this Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Katharina Gnath discusses the G20’s compromise on a large-scale reform of the IMF, including the deal that transfers two of the eight European Executive Board seats to emerging market countries. Over the coming months, Europe will have to make some tough choices on the implementation of the deal, Ms. Gnath writes, and she argues that European member states should use this opportunity to improve the EU’s international macroeconomic policy and relations with the IMF.

DAAD/AICGS Fellow Ms. Constance Baban explores the impact of the idea of the European Union as an area of freedom, security, and justice on Germany’s domestic security policy in the context of 9/11, and how the challenges of ‘Europeanization’ have been confronted within Germany’s security policy debate. Ms. Baban discusses actual changes in domestic security policy, but also focuses on the political and media discourse and how this has affected the outcome of several security policies since 9/11.

Two years after the financial and economic crisis began in the United States and shortly thereafter spread to Europe and Germany, the subsequent economic downturn continues to cause problems around the globe. In Issue Brief 38, “Recovering From an Economic Hangover: Lessons and Prescriptions for Transatlantic Cooperation,” AICGS Research Associate Kirsten Verclas analyzes the impact of the economic crisis on Germany, the EU, and the United States and offers policy recommendations for promoting greater cooperation in the future.

Globalization has facilitated the spread of investments and manufacturing by transnational corporations (TNCs), opening new opportunities, but also posing new challenges to their business models and highlighting the need for a restructuring of employment and production, writes DAAD/AICGS Fellow Dr. Michael Fichter. Dr. Fichter focuses on the role of labor relations in the operations and policies of German TNCs in the United States and examines if there is any convergence of labor relations policies across the Atlantic.

At 3.1 percent of GDP, Germany spends far above the OECD average on family benefits, whereas the United States spends only 1.3 percent of its GDP on family benefits. However, differences in spending are not the only contrasts regarding family policy in Germany and the U.S., writes former DAAD/AICGS Fellow Dr. Isabelle Kürschner. They also differ significantly with respect to parental leave systems, maternal employment rates, and the number of children born in each country. Dr. Kürschner examines the distinctiveness of German family policy in this Transatlantic Perspectives essay.

Cover Forging the future of Germany and Europe

The questions, choices, and decisions that Germany of 2010 faces today are vastly different than those the two Germanys confronted over two decades ago. This special publication, made possible by the Dräger Foundation, looks back not only at the changes in Germany as they unfolded in 1989 and 1990, but offers views on Germany’s role in Europe and the world in the decades to come.

While environmental concerns have recently taken a backseat to the economic and financial crisis, scientific projections on climate change continue to call for action. Yet, international cooperation has been hampered and a rift between developed and developing nations is increasingly evident. Companies from developed countries are interested in recouping their investments in clean energy technology through property rights; developing nations contend, however, that such technology must be made available to all nations. This Policy Report, featuring essays from Robert Percival and Miranda Schreurs, examines American and German views on this contentious issue, focusing on what roles technology transfer and intellectual property rights play in the climate policy debate.

When the Lisbon Treaty entered into force on 1 December 2009, no one quite knew how this would impact transatlantic relations or how an EU with increasing responsibilities would act toward its neighbors. In the months since, we have seen successes and setbacks: Implementation of the Lisbon Treaty is progressing within the EU with a new President and High Representative already in office, yet transatlantic tensions over the sharing of SWIFT data have called internal EU cooperation into question. In Policy Report 44, authors Frances Burwell and Ludger Kühnhardt examine the Lisbon Treaty and discuss what its influence will be not only on the EU, but also on transatlantic relations and the EU’s neighborhood.

In Policy Report #43, “Promoting Energy Innovation and Investment Through Transatlantic Transfer of Community Energy Policies,” Dale Medearis, Peter Garforth, and Stefan Blüm look to the European Union and Germany to draw lessons about community energy planning at the national and sub-national levels that can be transferred to the U.S. The authors examine issues such as the integration of land-use and transportation planning policies and the development of finance mechanisms and performance measures for energy efficient building construction.

In Policy Report 42, Annette Zimmer and Steven Rathgeb Smith look at social service and health care provision in the United States and Germany, examining the historical development of the different styles of welfare state, the role of public and private expenditures and providers, and current trends in the two countries. The authors offer answers to questions such as how is social service and health care provision affected by the new approach of designing social policy? They also address whether path-dependency in the two countries is still in place; or if German and American nonprofit social and health care providers, confronted with similar problems, tend to adopt similar strategies in order to keep or even enlarge their share of a growing market of social service provision.

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