Prior to the economic and financial crisis that began in 2008, the fiscal challenges of both
Europe and the U.S. largely were viewed as longer-term issues, associated with gradually
rising public expenditures in the face of aging populations (the main issue for Europe) and
soaring health care costs … As a consequence, the focus on both sides of the Atlantic has shifted toward fiscal consolidation—both in the near term as well as the longer term.

As Turkey continues to push for membership in the EU, many factors play a role in whether or not its acceptance will take hold. In this Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Rana Deep Islam looks at Turkey and the EU’s respective foreign policy strategies, using the recent unrest in Syria as a case study to …Read More

In the wake of the global financial crisis, the United States and the European Union have acted not only to recover from the crisis, but also to implement regulatory reforms to prevent another crisis of this magnitude in the future. The path to reform, however, has not been smooth. Political debates over fundamental issues have slowed progress toward making meaningful reform in regulating the financial sector.

In a new Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Dr. Sascha Dickel examines how the emergence of synthetic biology has affected scientific regulatory principles in both the U.S. and Europe, focusing on the two entities’ respective ethics councils and how they balance the potential promise and risks that accompany new synthetic biology technologies. Dr. Dickel presented his research findings in a seminar on June 23, 2011; a summary of this event is available below.

Despite improvements in the American and European financial markets in 2010, the fiscal crisis in Greece and the continually rising U.S. deficit have caused a decline of trust in the capital markets and have overshadowed any growth in the real economy. Overcoming the recession and returning to a sustainable growth pattern, however, is of paramount importance for the wealth and security of all nations, write AICGS Business & Economics Program Director Dr. Tim Stuchtey and S. Chase Gummer. In Issue Brief #39, Stuchtey and Gummer examine existing global economic imbalances and the impact these imbalances have on international security.

In this Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Pia Niedermeier writes that Germany has arguably changed policy amid domestic and international constraints and has become an active partner in the ISAF mission in Afghanistan despite prior reservations. Ms. Niedermeier contends that two main challenges remain for German-American relations and Germany’s role in the transatlantic alliance in and beyond this mission – a narrative gap and a strategic gap – which need to be addressed to ensure that all sides are on the same page for future missions.

In a new Transatlantic Perspectives essay, DAAD/AICGS Fellow Prof. Dr. Michael Brenner analyzes the role the Jewish past and the small contemporary Jewish community played in the foreign policy of the two German states before 1989, and to a smaller extent of unified Germany. The symbolic role the Jewish community played in the recognition of West Germany as a major player on the international stage was one of importance, Prof. Dr. Brenner argues, but in contrast, only during its last years of existence did the GDR use its official Jewish community to improve its foreign relations.

During the Cold War, Germany and the U.S. fostered close arms cooperation and development. Yet, after German unification, Germany focused on developing and procuring armament systems either domestically or within the EU. In Policy Report #46, Senior Non-Resident Fellow Alexander Ritzmann argues that German-American defense cooperation could once again become an area in which transatlantic cooperation helps to overcome challenges. Ritzmann offers some concrete policy recommendations to the U.S. and German governments to increase transatlantic defense cooperation and outlines what has led to the current lack of cooperation.

Although Germany’s share of immigrants ranks third in the EU behind Luxembourg and Switzerland, Germany still seems to struggle with being a country of immigration, writes DAAD/AICGS Fellow Prof. Dr. Michael Windzio. Regarding the increasing relative size of the first, second, and third generation immigrant population, however, it is a crucial question for Germany’s future development whether their integration will be successful. In this light, Prof. Dr. Windzio offers an overview of theories of immigrant incorporation in social networks and empirical results on segregation in social networks in the U.S. and Germany, further examining how the German and American debates on integration differ.

As the Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) prepares for its next meeting on 17 December 2010, it is time to inject new life into the institution, write AICGS Non-Resident Senior Fellow Dr. Stormy-Annika Mildner and Deborah Klein. In this new Transatlantic Perspectives essay written just in advance of the TEC’s meeting, the authors provide an overview of the current state of the transatlantic economic partnership, highlight the areas where trade is still impeded by barriers, and offer policy recommendations for maximizing the Council’s potential benefits.

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