AICGS is pleased to present two essays from the second round of the AICGS New Transatlantic Exchange Program: Giving Voice to Diversity. This innovative program establishes new connections between communities in Germany and the United States that have grown principally from an immigration background, and addresses common challenges of immigration and integration, such as discrimination, …Read More

AICGS is pleased to present two essays from the inaugural round of the AICGS New Transatlantic Exchange Program: Giving Voice to Diversity. This innovative program establishes new connections between communities in Germany and the United States that have grown principally from an immigration background, and addresses common challenges of immigration and integration, such as discrimination, …Read More

AICGS is pleased to present four essays that were inspired by an international conference held in Berlin in October 2015: “Dealing with the Past in Spaces, Places, Actions, and Institutions of Memory: A Comparative Reflection on European Experiences.”  The ideas elaborated in the essays are the authors’ own and are not a representation of the …Read More

Germany has increasingly found itself in a leadership role in the twenty-first century.  On challenges ranging from Russian aggression in Ukraine, to the European economic crisis, to the turmoil and resulting refugees from the Middle East, it is Germany who has been in the driver’s seat.  This role was nearly unthinkable seventy years ago. The …Read More

More than ten years after the EU initiated negotiations for Turkey’s EU membership, the country remains locked in negotiations, with economic concerns, human rights, and the Cyprus issue looming large. Turkey is an essential country in the West’s relations with the Middle East and is a key NATO ally.  Germany, as a leader in the …Read More

As we look to the German federal elections in 2013, AICGS’ newest publication considers three decades of a changing political landscape with the emergence of the Green Party. Andrei Markovits and Joseph Klaver examine the central issues within the party, and within German politics. The authors discuss how the Green Party built its “brand” and, …Read More

While analyses on the integration of immigrants and especially Muslim immigrants have multiplied in recent years, debates in the U.S. and Germany differ on these issues. Even though the U.S. and German debates are clearly different, a comparison of Muslim integration in the U.S. and in Europe is still drawn frequently, and many assumptions are made regarding the other side’s policies. In German-American Issues 13, “The Many Sides of Muslim Integration: A German-American Comparison,” authors Tara Bahrampour, Rauf Ceylan, Ariane Chebel d’Appollonia, Raida Chbib, Lily Gardner Feldman, and Mathias Rohe examine and challenge these assumptions, focusing on a range of major issues surrounding the debate.

When East Germans first crossed through the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989, no one knew that the consequences of this one small act would have global ramifications, bringing about the end of the forty year Cold War, and transforming the framework of global politics. The past twenty years have shown that the fall of the Berlin Wall is far from being just an end-point; rather, it was the beginning of a new era in German-American relations, in transatlantic cooperation, and in global affairs. The authors of German-American Issues 12 – J.D. Bindenagel, Manuel Lafont Rapnouil, Klaus Larres, and Holger Wolf – reflect on these and other consequences of the events of November 1989, proving that that historic moment is just as relevant today as it was twenty years ago.

AICGS is pleased to present German-American Issues 9, “Religion and Public Policy: A German-American Comparison.” The essays presented in this publication examine the issues of faith-based initiatives, stem cell research, and religious education from both German and American perspectives, and discuss how religion is understood in the public sphere, whether cultural or historical sensitivities constrain policymakers’ choices, and how religious concerns can be incorporated into a decision-making process that is not necessarily designed to account for these concerns.

In the sixty years since Israel’s founding, German-Israeli relations have been nothing if not complex. On the occasion of Israel’s sixtieth anniversary, the essays in German-American Issues 8 examine the issues of remembrance, the fading of the survivor generation, the new challenges faced by both countries in the twenty-first century, and the idea of a “normal” relationship between Germany and Israel. This volume features essays written by Michael Brenner, Lily Gardner Feldman, Harald Kindermann, Shimon Stein, and Frank Stern.

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