Explores the factors shaping important foreign and domestic policy debates in the United States, Germany, and Europe as they pertain to German-American relations and the German role in the international arena. The Foreign & Domestic Policy Program includes analysis of International Security Issues, including the twenty-first century challenge of Cybersecurity. It examines local and national Elections, and the role of Leadership in transatlantic policymaking. The program attempts to gain insight into appropriate reactions and responses to a variety of transatlantic challenges, including the German-American relationship with China, security and defense, climate, energy, immigration, intelligence, health care, terrorism, and relations with the Middle East, including Turkey.

In 2005, at the occasion of the UN’s sixtieth anniversary, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan called on world leaders to “recapture the spirit of San Francisco and forge a new world compact to advance the cause of larger freedom.” The Secretary General believed that the bitter debates in 2003 about the use of force in Iraq and the subsequent U.S.-led invasion of Iraq reflected deep divisions among UN member states regarding the role of the United Nations as an instrument of collective security…

On 29 March 2006 the United Nations Security Council for the first time addressed the issue of Iranian non-compliance with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Since the wording of the presidential statement, which had been heavily disputed among the five permanent members of the Security Council (P5), has been significantly watered-down, the statement does not predetermine any specific future action by the Security Council. For the moment, it is hard to predict whether the Security Council could agree on any more resolute steps should Iran refuse to cooperate…

Public diplomacy has become the new buzzword in foreign policy circles, with the construction of an effective public diplomacy strategy seen as an urgent foreign policy objective for
any country…

Securing the supply of energy is one of mankind’s basic needs. The exploitation of fossil fuels, (coal, petroleum, and more recently natural gas), has been one of the foundations of the development of industrial society…

German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder’s announcement on May 22, 2005 of early national parliamentary elections took many Europeans by surprise…

The debate over the long-standing Turkish bid for membership in the EU was settled with the December 2004 decision of the European Council to begin accession negotiations in October 2005. While the start of these negotiations is the first step in a process expected to take at least another decade, the issues surrounding that process will reflect the changing parameters of relations across the Atlantic and within the EU…

New global challenges and current transatlantic tensions require diverse approaches to political interaction. Enhanced cooperation and coordination are essential for a wide range of issues from international terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), to dealing with HIV/AIDS, energy, and environmental concerns. However, traditional ways of thinking about politics, still rooted in the political culture of the Cold War with a focus on intergovernmental relations, seem to prevail in today’s art of policymaking…

The Franco-German relationship is in a crisis, accused of no longer being capable of providing the impulsion for continued European integration, a function the tandem has successfully performed since the early postwar years. It has devolved, critics charge, into a marriage of convenience driven by a fear of losing influence in an enlarged Europe, and increasingly propelled by national interests to the detriment of Europe and further European integration…

Following his reelection in 2004, President George W. Bush interpreted the election outcome as a strong mandate for his policies. For his second term, he promoted Social Security reforms as the cornerstone of his domestic agenda, which was a surprise to many people. Social Security, officially called Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI), was introduced in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as part of the New Deal programs and has undergone reforms since then. Over the years Social Security has grown in size and continues to be very popular, especially among people in the middle and lower income classes, as Social Security benefits are often the main part of their retirement income. While Bush had occasionally talked about Social Security reform and even established a commission to develop reform proposals during his first term, he was not expected to focus on this issue during his second term…

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