Explores the factors shaping important foreign and domestic policy debates in the United States, Germany, and Europe as they pertain to German-American relations and the German role in the international arena. The Foreign & Domestic Policy Program includes analysis of International Security Issues, including the twenty-first century challenge of Cybersecurity. It examines local and national Elections, and the role of Leadership in transatlantic policymaking. The program attempts to gain insight into appropriate reactions and responses to a variety of transatlantic challenges, including the German-American relationship with China, security and defense, climate, energy, immigration, intelligence, health care, terrorism, and relations with the Middle East, including Turkey.

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Germany to take legal action if Trump taxes imports (DW) Germany should ditch austerity, embrace EU investment: Gabriel (The Business Times) China’s Taxes on Imported Cars Feed Trade Tensions With U.S. (NYT) Business groups draw battle lines over Obamacare replacement …Read More

It was an awkward date.  Both recognized they had to get to know each other, but neither one was particularly keen to do so.  Nevertheless, they went through the motions with a sense of obligation that was painfully obvious to everyone. Trump and Merkel are not going to be friends, and they may not ever …Read More

Amid the many controversies roiling Washington these days, there is a troubling trend that is greater than the sum of the parts: America’s singular leadership role, held with minimal challenge since the end of World War II, is rapidly fading. A man who campaigned on the promise of making America great again now risks doing …Read More

Amid confusion and disorientation regarding the Trump administration’s new foreign and security policy, Europe is reflecting on its security challenges at home and abroad in a new era. After the successful closing of this year’s Munich Security Conference, AICGS President Dr. Jackson Janes sits down with Wolfgang Ischinger, Chairman of the MSC and AICGS Trustee, …Read More

Since the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Europeans have reflected on the transatlantic relationship they’ve known  for over seven decades, and which now seems to be at risk. Guided by an “America First” rhetoric, a transactional approach to U.S. foreign policy and potential U.S. disengagement from key international institutions, President Donald Trump is forcing Europe to …Read More

A Collection from This Week’s News on Important Issues for German-American Relations Business and Economics Germany to press G20 to sign off on free trade amid worries about US stance: Sources (CNBC) Audi searched by German police in Dieselgate swoop (Reuters) Germany Eyes 1.9 Percent Increase in Spending Next Year (US News) Trump adviser Navarro: …Read More

Is populism reshaping the political arena? Will political uncertainty hamper economic growth? How can civil society play a role in the changing international environment? Can the transatlantic partners build a coherent approach to Russia, to cybersecurity, to humanitarian crises? These and other questions have been the topic of discussion for participants in AICGS’ program “A …Read More

In this article in the New York Times, Dr. Jackson Janes weighs in on expectations for Merkel’s March 14 visit with Trump, noting that a number of corporate CEOs will be part of her delegation.  Dr. Janes tells the Times, “The thing she’ll come back with is, ‘Do you know that there are thousands of …Read More

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel has her first face-to-face meeting with President Trump in Washington on March 17,* she will have two key tests. Can she take the sting out of the burden sharing debate between the United States and Europe in NATO? And can the U.S. and Germany find common ground on trade policy, an …Read More

It is said that Mark Twain once commented, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Maybe a more accurate version is that history doesn’t repeat itself, but people often do—for better or for worse.

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