Generates insights into the institutional, political, cultural, and historical factors that shape our responses to deepening economic integration and the challenges of globalization. Current issues in the Business & Economics Program include Trade and Financial Governance, which looks at macroeconomic discrepancies, studies the responses of central banks and fiscal authorities to current challenges, and analyzes transatlantic trade and growth. Educating the Future Workforce assesses ongoing workforce development and labor market challenges for the United States and Europe. It seeks lessons on work-based learning systems and their role in boosting employment and economic growth from other countries’ experiences in an effort to apply them to the United States. Under the topic Energy and Climate Policy, it examines European energy security and the economic impact of energy and environmental policy.

There are some words in German that are hard to translate: Gemütlich, fahrvernügnen, or Gesamtkonzept Mittelstand is another example. Technically it means small and middle-sized firms. But that is an elastic definition as the actual size can be very small or very large. The vast majority of companies in Germany—and in the U.S. —can be classified …Read More

As Germany assumes the Presidency of the G20 largest world economies, a new U.S. president takes office, and uncertainties surround the future of the global economic order, the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies at Johns Hopkins University is launching a new Geoeconomics Project in 2017. Peter S. Rashish, who counts over 25 years of …Read More

The hometown Washington Redskins may have just missed making it to the playoffs of the National Football League championships this season. But they showed once again how important a strong offense is to success, especially when the team’s defense is not performing at a world-class level. What is true for professional sports also holds for …Read More

Of the U.S.’ trade policy and trade relationships over the past twenty-five years, Robert Zoellick, former World Bank president, U.S. Trade Representative, deputy Secretary of State, and AICGS Trustee, writes in the New York Times that “Today’s new conventional wisdom is that trade is bad politics. But the fall of the Soviet Union showed that …Read More

2016 has seen significant upheaval and sets the stage for an even bumpier 2017. Leading up to national elections in several major European economies—Germany, France, the Netherlands, and potentially Italy—voters and politicians alike are watching closely to see how Britain’s economy fares as Brexit plays out. The average individual has personally felt few effects of …Read More

Which actors contribute to the stabilization of post-conflict societies—and how—is a question of utmost importance. Scholars and practitioners alike have argued that economic interdependencies and economic well-being is a beneficial factor in stabilizing a post-violent region, and in aiding a process of reconciliation.[1] After all, if people experience that peace is worthwhile, conflict seems less …Read More

2016 As a Special Year for the UK and the U.S. The UK experienced a rather surprising victory by the supporters of Brexit—i.e., those in favor of the UK leaving the European Union. The British referendum result of a majority in favor of Brexit was indeed a surprise to most observers, however, not really to …Read More

In the current climate of rising populism—or what Mark Blyth calls “global Trumpism”—the United States and Germany remain key engines of the global economy. While Germany has long been admired for its export-led model, the United States is a powerhouse of household consumption. But both economies are vulnerable to problems endemic to their growth models. …Read More

The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-09 ended a two-decade period of steady economic growth and stable inflation in the world’s advanced markets, the so-called “Great Moderation.”[1] Since the mid-1980s, this long-term stabilization in macroeconomic indicators had provided the grounds for continuous cross-border integration across financial markets, trade relations, and societies, giving way to an unprecedented …Read More

I feel lucky that my career has taken place during a dynamic period in the relationship between the U.S. and Europe.  I started college as the Reagan presidency was ending, not long after the Evil Empire speech, and graduated soon after the fall of the Berlin Wall.  I was studying in Europe during the autumn …Read More

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