The domestic political disquiet over the refugees since the March 13 state elections in Germany has not subsided. On the contrary, the debate about German identity and the chancellor’s governance has grown more intense. Chancellor Merkel has upset Germany’s European partners. They are wary of her curious mixture of profound ethics paired with determined self-assurance …Read More

Barack Obama’s final year in office is one with the world in upheaval. It is also the year that will shape the security strategy for the next U.S. president. This commentary paper from J.D. Bindenagel, Director of AICGS partner organization the Center for International Security and Governance at the Universität Bonn, examines Obama’s security strategy, …Read More

Hans-Dietrich Genscher was German foreign minister when I first met him.  On 1 October 1982, I was in Bonn to consult with Wolfgang Ischinger, his office director.  Our meeting was suddenly interrupted by the televised report about Genscher, who announced he and his party, the FDP, were leaving the governing coalition with Helmut Schmidt and …Read More

AICGS is pleased to present this collection of essays reflecting on the 25th anniversary of German unification in October 2015. We are grateful to those who have contributed to this collection, all of whom have been affiliated with and supported the Institute in many different capacities. These essays leave us with thoughts not only about …Read More

This speech was delivered as the Columbus Day Lecture 2014 at the Center for International Security and Governance, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, where Ambassador James D. Bindenagel is the Henry Kissinger Professor. Students, Ladies and Gentlemen, I wish to thank Professor Sabine Sielke and the North America Program for inviting me to deliver the Columbus Day …Read More

This is a story about the secret of freedom—courage.  Germans in Leipzig courageously faced down a regime that had killed fellow citizens, whose only crime was to seek freedom and escape over the Berlin Wall. East German leader Erich Honecker predicted in January 1989 that the Berlin Wall would last 100 years. Would it? In …Read More

In this article in the Globalist, co-author of AICGS German-American Issues 12 Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel outlines Germany’s post-election future in the euro zone, broader foreign policy, and leadership in the international community. On all counts, Germany has a large role to fill and must be “sober-minded, cooperative.” Will reluctance impede progress in these areas?

In this Op-Ed, which originally appeared in Süddeutsche Zeitung on January 12, 2012, J.D. Bindenagel takes a brief look back at the history of Europe leading up to the push for a European Monetary Union. According to Mr. Bindenagel, the future success of the Euro rests on the will of Europe’s leaders, and Germany in particular, to make their monetary union work.

Germany’s struggle to understand and to define its global responsibilities through the euro crisis, Afghanistan, and now Libya has taken the country’s policy course through more turns than in the Nürburgring racetrack, writes Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel, vice president at DePaul University and a regular contributor to the Advisor. Because of its unclear policies, Germany faces the challenge of being sidelined when the danger of the moment in the Middle East urgently needs European leadership, Bindenagel argues. This essay originally appeared in the May 18, 2011, edition of Süddeutsche Zeitung.

When East Germans first crossed through the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989, no one knew that the consequences of this one small act would have global ramifications, bringing about the end of the forty year Cold War, and transforming the framework of global politics. The past twenty years have shown that the fall of the Berlin Wall is far from being just an end-point; rather, it was the beginning of a new era in German-American relations, in transatlantic cooperation, and in global affairs. The authors of German-American Issues 12 – J.D. Bindenagel, Manuel Lafont Rapnouil, Klaus Larres, and Holger Wolf – reflect on these and other consequences of the events of November 1989, proving that that historic moment is just as relevant today as it was twenty years ago.