Tim Buthe: Recipient of the 2012 DAAD Prize

October 25, 2012 Print

AICGS is delighted to announce that Tim Büthe, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Duke University and Senior Fellow of the Duke Rethinking Regulation Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, received the 2012 DAAD Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in German and European Studies.  This award was presented to Professor Büthe by Former National Security Advisor and Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger during AICGS’ “Symposium on the Global Economy, Financial Markets, and the Auto Industry: A German/American Perspective” in New York City.

Professor Büthe’s academic work and teaching focuses on the effects institutions have on the international political system and global economy.  Specifically, Büthe analyzes how regulatory authority has devolved to private and non-state actors.  Büthe invented the concept of global private politics, or more specifically how domestic and international institutions interact and “why some win and others lose in the simultaneous internationalization and privatization of rule-making.”   This concept is developed thoroughly in his recent book New Global Rulers: The Privatization of Regulation in the World Economy (Princeton University Press, 2011).  Additionally, Büthe’s work has been published in the American Political Science Review and the American Journal of Political Science.

Recipients of the DAAD Prize are selected by a jury composed of highly respected scholars in the field. AICGS presents this award, including a $5,000 stipend, every year to foster the next generation of American scholarship on Germany and encourage original contributions to the interdisciplinary scope of German Studies. Every three years a prize recipient is chosen from the field of Politics and International Relations; the other two fields for the award are Humanities and Economics. Professor Büthe has undoubtedly met the requirements and expectations of this award and AICGS is proud to recognize him for his outstanding contributions.

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